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Oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming cells of the central nervous system (CNS), and astrocytes constitute macroglia. This review deals with the recent progress related to the origin and differentiation of the oligodendrocytes, their relationships to other neural cells, and functional neuroglial interactions under physiological conditions and in(More)
The destiny of the mitotically active cells of the subventricular zone (SVZ) in adult rodents is to migrate to the olfactory bulb, where they contribute to the replacement of granular and periglomerular neurons. However, these adult neural progenitors also can be mobilized in periventricular white matter and triggered to differentiate into astrocytes and(More)
The X-linked form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX) is associated with mutations in the gene encoding connexin32 (Cx32), which is expressed in Schwann cells. We have compared the functional properties of 11 Cx32 mutations with those of the wild-type protein by testing their ability to form intercellular channels in the paired oocyte expression system.(More)
We studied the immunological basis for the very potent encephalitogenicity of myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a minor component of myelin in the CNS that is widely used to induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). For this purpose, we generated a mutant mouse lacking a functional mog gene. This MOG-deficient mouse presents no(More)
Myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is found on the surface of myelinating oligodendrocytes and external lamellae of myelin sheaths in the central nervous system, and it is a target antigen in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis. We have isolated bovine, mouse, and rat MOG cDNA clones and shown that the developmental(More)
Neurological deficit in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) and multiple sclerosis (MS) is probably a consequence of synergy between T and B cell responses to CNS antigens. During the demyelinating phase of chronic relapsing EAE in ABH mice, anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) responses were increased compared to the inflammatory acute(More)
Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 (CMT1) disease or hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type I (HMSNI) is an autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy. In most CMT1 families, the disease cosegregates with a 1.5-Mb duplication on chromosome 17p11.2 (CMT1A). A few patients have been found with mutations in the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP-22) gene located in(More)
Alexander disease (AXD) is the first primary astrocytic disorder. This encephalopathy is caused by dominant mutations in the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene, encoding the main intermediate filament of astrocyte. Pathologically, this neurodegenerative disease is characterised by dystrophic astrocytes containing intermediate filament aggregates(More)
Myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is expressed specifically in the central nervous system (CNS) by myelinating glial cells, the oligodendrocytes. The external location of MOG on myelin sheaths and its late expression during myelinogenesis argue for a role of MOG in the completion of myelin and maintenance of its integrity. MOG is a target(More)
X-linked dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMTX) neuropathy has been mapped to the Xq13 region. Subsequently, several mutations that could account for CMTX have been detected in the coding part of the connexin32 (Cx32) gene, which is located within this region. In order to develop more specific diagnostic tools, we have begun a systematic screening of families(More)