Daniel H Cohn

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Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a generalized disorder of connective tissue characterized by fragile bones and easy susceptibility to fracture. Most cases of OI are caused by mutations in type I collagen. We have identified and assembled structural mutations in type I collagen genes (COL1A1 and COL1A2, encoding the proalpha1(I) and proalpha2(I) chains,(More)
Osteogenesis imperfecta is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous brittle bone disorder that results from defects in the synthesis, structure, or posttranslational modification of type I procollagen. Dominant forms of OI result from mutations in COL1A1 or COL1A2, which encode the chains of the type I procollagen heterotrimer. The mildest form of OI(More)
The brachyolmias constitute a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of skeletal dysplasias characterized by a short trunk, scoliosis and mild short stature. Here, we identify a locus for an autosomal dominant form of brachyolmia on chromosome 12q24.1-12q24.2. Among the genes in the genetic interval, we selected TRPV4, which encodes a calcium(More)
Autosomal dominant osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is caused by mutations in the genes (COL1A1 or COL1A2) encoding the chains of type I collagen. Recently, dysregulation of hydroxylation of a single proline residue at position 986 of both the triple-helical domains of type I collagen alpha1(I) and type II collagen alpha1(II) chains has been implicated in the(More)
Metatropic dysplasia is a clinical heterogeneous skeletal dysplasia characterized by short extremities, a short trunk with progressive kyphoscoliosis, and craniofacial abnormalities that include a prominent forehead, midface hypoplasia, and a squared-off jaw. Dominant mutations in the gene encoding TRPV4, a calcium permeable ion channel, were identified all(More)
Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a spectrum of genetic disorders characterized by bone fragility. It is caused by dominant mutations affecting the synthesis and/or structure of type I procollagen or by recessively inherited mutations in genes responsible for the posttranslational processing/trafficking of type I procollagen. Recessive OI type VI is unique(More)
The filamins are cytoplasmic proteins that regulate the structure and activity of the cytoskeleton by cross-linking actin into three-dimensional networks, linking the cell membrane to the cytoskeleton and serving as scaffolds on which intracellular signaling and protein trafficking pathways are organized (reviewed in refs. 1,2). We identified mutations in(More)
The filamins are a family of cytoplasmic proteins that bind to and organize actin filaments, link membrane proteins to the cytoskeleton, and provide a scaffold for signaling molecules. Mutations in the gene encoding filamin B (FLNB) cause a spectrum of osteochondrodysplasias, including atelosteogenesis type I (AOI) and atelosteogenesis type III (AOIII). AOI(More)
The spondylometaphyseal dysplasias (SMDs) are a group of short-stature disorders distinguished by abnormalities in the vertebrae and the metaphyses of the tubular bones. SMD Kozlowski type (SMDK) is a well-defined autosomal-dominant SMD characterized by significant scoliosis and mild metaphyseal abnormalities in the pelvis. The vertebrae exhibit(More)
This report identifies human skeletal diseases associated with mutations in WNT1. In 10 family members with dominantly inherited, early-onset osteoporosis, we identified a heterozygous missense mutation in WNT1, c.652T→G (p.Cys218Gly). In a separate family with 2 siblings affected by recessive osteogenesis imperfecta, we identified a homozygous nonsense(More)