Daniel Bendor

Learn More
Pitch perception is critical for identifying and segregating auditory objects, especially in the context of music and speech. The perception of pitch is not unique to humans and has been experimentally demonstrated in several animal species. Pitch is the subjective attribute of a sound's fundamental frequency (f(0)) that is determined by both the temporal(More)
The core region of primate auditory cortex contains a primary and two primary-like fields (AI, primary auditory cortex; R, rostral field; RT, rostrotemporal field). Although it is reasonable to assume that multiple core fields provide an advantage for auditory processing over a single primary field, the differential roles these fields play and whether they(More)
How the brain processes temporal information embedded in sounds is a core question in auditory research. This article synthesizes recent studies from our laboratory regarding neural representations of time-varying signals in auditory cortex and thalamus in awake marmoset monkeys. Findings from these studies show that 1) the primary auditory cortex (A1) uses(More)
The hippocampus is essential for encoding self-experienced events into memory. During sleep, neural activity in the hippocampus related to a recent experience has been observed to spontaneously reoccur, and this 'replay' has been postulated to be important for memory consolidation. Task-related cues can enhance memory consolidation when presented during a(More)
A sequence of acoustic events is perceived either as one continuous sound or as a stream of temporally discrete sounds (acoustic flutter), depending on the rate at which the acoustic events repeat. Acoustic flutter is perceived at repetition rates near or below the lower limit for perceiving pitch, and is akin to the discrete percepts of visual flicker and(More)
Pitch, our perception of how high or low a sound is on a musical scale, is a fundamental perceptual attribute of sounds and is important for both music and speech. After more than a century of research, the exact mechanisms used by the auditory system to extract pitch are still being debated. Theoretically, pitch can be computed using either spectral or(More)
Pitch, our perception of how high or low a sound is on a musical scale, crucially depends on a sound's periodicity. If an acoustic signal is temporally jittered so that it becomes aperiodic, the pitch will no longer be perceivable even though other acoustical features that normally covary with pitch are unchanged. Previous electrophysiological studies(More)
Pitch perception is crucial for vocal communication, music perception, and auditory object processing in a complex acoustic environment. How pitch is represented in the cerebral cortex has for a long time remained an unanswered question in auditory neuroscience. Several lines of evidence now point to a distinct non-primary region of auditory cortex in(More)
The core region of primate auditory cortex contains a primary and two primary-like fields (AI-primary auditory cortex, R-rostral field, RT-rostrotemporal field). Although it is reasonable to assume that multiple core fields provide an advantage for auditory processing over a single primary field, the differential roles these fields play and whether they(More)
In auditory cortex, temporal information within a sound is represented by two complementary neural codes: a temporal representation based on stimulus-locked firing and a rate representation, where discharge rate co-varies with the timing between acoustic events but lacks a stimulus-synchronized response. Using a computational neuronal model, we find that(More)