Daniel Abell

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Fetal growth retardation ranks third after prematurity and malformations as a cause of perinatal deaths. Antenatal fetal monitoring (biochemical testing of fetoplacental function plus cardiotocography) has emerged as the most important means of reduction in the number of stillbirths and improvement in the quality of survival of infants who are born alive.(More)
In a series of 2434 patients with pre-eclampsia, the prevalence of fetal growth retardation was 8.7 per cent compared with 8.6 per cent in the total hospital population. The prevalence was increased in early-onset pre-eclampsia (18.2 per cent) (P less than 0.001) and reduced in late-onset pre-eclampsia (5.6 per cent) (P less than 0.001). In patients who(More)
Analysis of 2,000 consecutive patients who had a three-hour 50-gm. oral glucose tolerance test done in the third trimester of pregnancy has shown that the three-hour reading was not necessary for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes. It was found that hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia (95th and 5th percentiles, respectively, for plasma glucose levels) were(More)
A study of maternal glucose tolerance conducted during 137 pregnancies in which the infant weighed 4540 g or more at birth revealed an increased incidence of hyperglycemia (20.4% P less than 0.01). Only when a birth weight of more than the 99th percentile was considered was a significant association with maternal hyperglycemia evident. However, 105 of the(More)
This study reports the fetal outcome in 500 pregnancies when the baby weighed less than the 10th centile for gestational age at birth, compared with that in a series of 500 pregnancies where there was a normal weight for gestation. Fetal growth retardation (0-9th centile) had a significant positive association with perinatal mortality (5.2% versus 1.2%, P(More)
In a series of 794 patients who had glucose tolerance tests done before the onset of pre-eclampsia, both hypoglycaemia (less than 5th percentile) and hyperglycaemia (P less than 95th percentile) had a significant association with early-onset severe pre-eclampsia ( less than 0.05). In the total series of 794 patients, hypoglycaemia had a significant(More)
In a series of 26,209 patiens, the incidence of pre-eclampsia was 9.3%, being significantly higher in primiparae (14.1%) than multiparae (5.7%) (P less than 0.001). In patients with early-onset pre-eclampsia there were highly significant (P less than 0.001) increases in the incidences of proteinuria, severe hypertension, placental abruption, fetal growth(More)
This study reports the associations between antenatal complications, subnormal urinary oestriol excretion and perinatal death in 500 pregnancies when the baby weighed less than the 10th centile for gestational age at birth, compared with those in a series of 500 pregnancies when the baby was of a normal weight for gestation. The overall incidence of(More)