Dana K. Mirick

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BACKGROUND Exposure to light at night may increase the risk of breast cancer by suppressing the normal nocturnal production of melatonin by the pineal gland, which, in turn, could increase the release of estrogen by the ovaries. This study investigated whether such exposure is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in women. METHODS Case(More)
To investigate whether the use of commonly-prescribed medications, primarily antihypertensives and antidepressants, is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Participants from a population-based case-control study were re-contacted 5–8 years after the original study regarding prescription and non-prescription medication use during the 10 years(More)
Chronic exposure to 60-Hz magnetic fields may increase the risk of breast cancer by suppressing the normal nocturnal production of melatonin. This population-based case-control study investigated whether such exposure is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in women aged 20-74 years from the greater Seattle, Washington, area. Cases were(More)
There is increasing interest in the possibility that disruption of normal circadian rhythm may increase the risk of developing cancer. Persons who engage in nightshift work may exhibit altered nighttime melatonin levels and reproductive hormone profiles that could increase the risk of hormone-related diseases, including breast cancer. Epidemiologic studies(More)
Exposure to 60-Hz magnetic fields may increase breast cancer risk by suppressing the normal nocturnal rise in melatonin. This 1994-1996 Washington State study investigated whether such exposure was associated with lower nocturnal urinary concentration of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin in 203 women aged 20-74 years with no history of breast cancer. Each woman was(More)
It would be most useful to identify a biomarker of circadian dysregulation that could be used in epidemiologic studies of the effects of circadian disruption in humans. An indicator of circulating melatonin level has been shown to be a good biomarker of circadian dysregulation and has been associated with nightshift work and exposure to light-at-night in(More)
The rumor that antiperspirant use causes breast cancer continues to circulate the Internet. Although unfounded, there have been no published epidemiologic studies to support or refute this claim. This population-based case- control study investigated a possible relationship between use of products applied for underarm perspiration and the risk for breast(More)
Consumption of alcoholic beverages may suppress circulating melatonin levels at night, possibly resulting in an increase in circulating estrogen. An increased estrogen burden could increase the risk of breast cancer. This study was designed to investigate whether alcohol consumption is associated with a decrease in nighttime melatonin levels in a group of(More)
Ingestion of soil may be a potentially important pathway of exposure to environmental pollutants. Although several studies have estimated soil ingestion in children, data on ingestion in adults are sparse. The purposes of this study were to estimate soil ingestion in children aged 3 to 8 years and their parents, identify factors associated with increased(More)
Since poor sleep quality is associated with multiple health problems, it is important to understand factors that may affect sleep patterns. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a continuous, 60-Hz, nighttime magnetic field exposure on sleep outcomes in young women sleeping at home. The study was a randomized crossover trial, comparing(More)