Damrong Tayanin

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The aim of this study is to investigate how the presence of lexical tones influences the realization of focal accent and sentence intonation. The language studied is Kammu, a language particularly well suited for the study as it has both tonal and non-tonal dialects. The main finding is that lexical tone exerts an influence on both sentence and focal accent(More)
This paper presents a study of prosodic phrasing in a non-tonal dialect of Kammu, a MonKhmer language spoken in Northern Laos. Prosodic phrasing is seen as correlated with syntactic and informational structures, and the description is made referring to these two levels. The material investigated comprises sentences of different lengths and syntactic(More)
The aim of this study is to investigate whether the occurrence of lexical tones in a language imposes restrictions on its pitch range. We use data from Kammu, a Mon-Khmer language spoken in Northern Laos, which has one dialect with, and one without, lexical tones. The main finding is that speakers of the tonal dialect have a narrower pitch range, and also a(More)
The phrase-final accent can typically contain a multitude of simultaneous prosodic signals. In this study, aimed at separating the effects of lexical tone from phrase-final intonation, phrase-final accents of two dialects of Kammu were analyzed. Kammu, a Mon-Khmer language spoken primarily in northern Laos, has dialects with lexical tones and dialects with(More)
Kammu, a Mon-Khmer language spoken in Northern Laos, is a language that has developed lexical tones rather recently, from the point of view of language history. One of the main dialects of this language is a tone language with high or low tone on each syllable, while the other main dialect lacks lexical tones. The dialects differ only marginally in other(More)
The aim of this study is to investigate whether the occurrence of lexical tones in a language imposes restrictions on its pitch range. Kammu, a MonKhmer language spoken in Northern Laos comprises dialects with and without lexical tones and with no other major phonological differences. We use Kammu spontaneous speech to investigate differences in pitch range(More)
Kammu, a Mon-Khmer language spoken in Northern Laos is a language that has developed lexical tones rather recently, from the point of view of language history. One of the main dialects of this language is a tone language of the “East Asian” type with (high or low) tone on each syllable, while the other main dialect lacks lexical tones. The dialects differ(More)
In this study we investigate utterance-final intonation in two dialects of Kammu, one tonal and one non-tonal. While the general patterns of utterance-final intonation are similar between the dialects, we do find clear evidence that the lexical tones of the tonal dialect restrict the pitch range and the realization of focus. Speaker engagement can have a(More)
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