Daichi Nozaki

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In literature, it has been suggested that the CNS anticipates spontaneous change in body position during quiet stance and continuously modulates ankle extensor muscle activity to compensate for the change. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether velocity feedback contributes by modulating ankle extensor activities in an anticipatory fashion,(More)
Although a limb's motion appears to be similar across unimanual and bimanual movements, here we demonstrate partial, but not complete, transfer of learning across these behavioral contexts, hidden learning that remains intact (but invisible) until the original context is again encountered, and the ability to associate two conflicting force fields(More)
Rapid sequential taps delivered first to one location and then to another on the skin create the somatosensory illusion that the tapping is occurring at intermediate locations between the actual stimulus sites, as if a small rabbit were hopping along the skin from the first site to the second (called the "cutaneous rabbit"). Previous behavioral studies have(More)
Series cross-section images of the upper extremity were obtained for four men by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and anatomical cross-sectional areas (ACSA) of elbow flexor muscles [biceps brachii (BIC), brachialis (BRA), brachioradialis (BRD)] and extensor muscles [triceps brachii (TRI)] were measured. Physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) was(More)
A sensorimotor control task often requires an accurate estimation of the timing of the arrival of an external target (e.g., when hitting a pitched ball). Conventional studies of human timing processes have ignored the stochastic features of target timing: e.g., the speed of the pitched ball is not generally constant, but is variable. Interestingly, based on(More)
Human quiet standing is often modeled as a single inverted pendulum rotating around the ankle joint, under the assumption that movement around the hip joint is quite small. However, several recent studies have shown that movement around the hip joint can play a significant role in the efficient maintenance of the center of body mass (COM) above the support(More)
We can adapt movements to a novel dynamic environment (e.g., tool use, microgravity, and perturbation) by acquiring an internal model of the dynamics. Although multiple environments can be learned simultaneously if each environment is experienced with different limb movement kinematics, it is controversial as to whether multiple internal models for a(More)
As long as we only focus on kinematics, rhythmic movement appears to be a concatenation of discrete movements or discrete movement appears to be a truncated rhythmic movement. However, whether or not the neural control processes of discrete and rhythmic movements are distinct has not yet been clearly understood. Here, we address this issue by examining the(More)
Direct evidence supporting the contribution of upper limb motion on the generation of locomotive motor output in humans is still limited. Here, we aimed to examine the effect of upper limb motion on locomotor-like muscle activities in the lower limb in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). By imposing passive locomotion-like leg movements, all cervical(More)
It is now well recognized that muscle activity can be induced even in the paralyzed lower limb muscles of persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) by imposing locomotion-like movements on both of their legs. Although the significant role of the afferent input related to hip joint movement and body load has been emphasized considerably in previous studies, the(More)