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Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer high risks of breast and ovarian cancer, but the average magnitude of these risks is uncertain and may depend on the context. Estimates based on multiple-case families may be enriched for mutations of higher risk and/or other familial risk factors, whereas risk estimates from studies based on cases unselected for(More)
The contribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2 to inherited breast cancer was assessed by linkage and mutation analysis in 237 families, each with at least four cases of breast cancer, collected by the Breast Cancer Linkage Consortium. Families were included without regard to the occurrence of ovarian or other cancers. Overall, disease was linked to BRCA1 in an(More)
BACKGROUND Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are found in most families with cases of both breast and ovarian cancer or with many cases of early-onset breast cancer. However, in an outbred population, the prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in patients with breast cancer who were unselected for a family history of this disease has not been(More)
Cancer occurrence in 164 families with breast/ovarian cancer and germline BRCA2 mutations was studied to evaluate the evidence for genotype-phenotype correlations. Mutations in a central portion of the gene (the "ovarian cancer cluster region" [OCCR]) were associated with a significantly higher ratio of cases of ovarian:breast cancer in female carriers than(More)
In computing the probability that a woman is a BRCA1 or BRCA2 carrier for genetic counselling purposes, it is important to allow for the fact that other breast cancer susceptibility genes may exist. We used data from both a population based series of breast cancer cases and high risk families in the UK, with information on BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status,(More)
Germline mutations in a gene on chromosome 17q known as BRCA1 are responsible for a large proportion of inherited predispositions to breast and ovarian cancer. In 33 families with evidence of linkage to BRCA1, we estimated the risks of breast and ovarian cancer from the occurrence of second cancers in individuals with breast cancer, and examined the risks(More)
BACKGROUND Women genetically predisposed to breast cancer often develop the disease at a young age when dense breast tissue reduces the sensitivity of X-ray mammography. Our aim was, therefore, to compare contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE MRI) with mammography for screening. METHODS We did a prospective multicentre cohort study in 649 women(More)
Multiple genetic loci confer susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancers. We have previously developed a model (BOADICEA) under which susceptibility to breast cancer is explained by mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, as well as by the joint multiplicative effects of many genes (polygenic component). We have now updated BOADICEA using additional family data from(More)
An increased risk of breast cancer in women with a family history of breast cancer has been demonstrated by many studies using a variety of study designs. However, the extent of this risk varies according to the nature of the family history (type of relative affected, age at which relative developed breast cancer and number of relatives affected) and may(More)
The breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA2 on chromosome 13q12-13 has recently been identified. Germline mutations of BRCA2 are predicted to account for approximately 35% of families with multiple case, early onset female breast cancer, and they are also associated with an increased risk of male breast cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer and pancreatic(More)