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The development of evidence-informed physical activity guidelines for adults with spinal cord injury
TLDR
People with SCI, clinicians, researchers and fitness programmers are encouraged to adopt these rigorously developed guidelines to improve physical fitness in people with spinal cord injury.
Determinants of Physical Activity Among People with Spinal Cord Injury: A Test of Social Cognitive Theory
TLDR
Self-regulation is the most potent Social Cognitive Theory predictor of physical activity in people with spinal cord injury, and its determinants should be targeted in physical activity-enhancing interventions.
The effects of exercise training on physical capacity, strength, body composition and functional performance among adults with spinal cord injury: a systematic review
TLDR
There is strong evidence that exercise, performed 2–3 times per week at moderate-to-vigorous intensity, increases physical capacity and muscular strength in the chronic SCI population; the evidence is not strong with respect to the effects of exercise on body composition or functional performance.
Spasticity outcome measures in spinal cord injury: psychometric properties and clinical utility
TLDR
Focusing on one or two spasticity outcome measures can misrepresent the extent and influence ofSpasticity on SCI patients and may be better measured with an appropriate battery of tests, including the AS or MAS along with PSFS.
Information needs and information sources of individuals living with spinal cord injury.
TLDR
The results reveal that respondents have unmet information needs, despite the fact that they typically access information through a variety of channels, and the need for an information source that is accessible and delivers high quality information is pointed to.
The health and life priorities of individuals with spinal cord injury: a systematic review.
TLDR
This systematic review examined studies that directly surveyed people with SCI to ascertain their health priorities and life domains of importance to identify functional recovery priorities and health, as well as relationships, emerged as important life domains.
Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Evidence: Methods of the SCIRE Systematic Review.
TLDR
The Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Evidence (SCIRE) is a synthesis of the research evidence underlying rehabilitation interventions to improve the health of people living with SCI and in this issue six papers relevant to SCI rehabilitation clinicians are presented.
Greater daily leisure time physical activity is associated with lower chronic disease risk in adults with spinal cord injury.
TLDR
Greater daily LTPA is associated with lower levels of selected CVD and type 2 diabetes risk factors in individuals living with SCI, and whether this relationship translates into a lower incidence of these chronic diseases has yet to be determined.
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