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ESTIMATING RELATEDNESS USING GENETIC MARKERS
TLDR
A new method is described for estimating genetic relatedness from genetic markers such as protein polymorphisms based on Grafen's (1985) relatedness coefficient, which eliminates a downward bias for small sample sizes and improves estimation of relatedness for subsets of population samples.
Computer software for performing likelihood tests of pedigree relationship using genetic markers
TLDR
A program, Kinship, is presented, designed to use likelihood techniques to test for any non‐inbred pedigree relationship between pairs of individuals, using single‐locus codominant genetic markers.
KIN SELECTION AND SOCIAL INSECTS
TLDR
Insect societies are macroscopic, and because they span the entire range from solitary individuals to essentially superorganismal colonies, they offer an accessible model for how such transitions can happen.
A GENERAL MODEL FOR KIN SELECTION
  • D. Queller
  • Biology
    Evolution; international journal of organic…
  • 1 April 1992
TLDR
It is shown how adopting a genic perspective yields a very general version of inclusive fitness thinking that remains pleasingly simple and transparent.
Kinship, reciprocity and synergism in the evolution of social behaviour
  • D. Queller
  • Biology, Psychology
    Nature
  • 1 November 1985
TLDR
A model the results of which may be expressed in terms of either personal or inclusive fitness, and which combines the advantages of both is developed; it is general, exact, simple and empirically useful.
Microsatellites and kinship.
Quantitative Genetics, Inclusive Fitness, and Group Selection
  • D. Queller
  • Biology
    The American Naturalist
  • 1 March 1992
TLDR
This rule is used to show how Price's covariance equation is related to standard quantitative genetic results and to derive quantitative genetic equations for inclusive fitness and group selection and shows that the group-selection model is no more general than the inclusive-fitness viewpoint.
Unrelated helpers in a social insect
TLDR
Microsatellite markers are used to reveal an unexpected and unique social system in what is probably the best-studied social wasp, Polistes dominulus, which is functionally unlike other social insects, but similar to certain vertebrate societies, in which the unrelated helpers gain through inheritance of a territory or a mate.
Why do females care more than males?
  • D. Queller
  • Biology
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London…
  • 22 November 1997
TLDR
A null model using the Fisherian constraint that total male and female reproduction must be equal shows that lower probability of parentage for males does tend to make males less likely than females to provide care, and shows how sexual selection stemming from premating asymmetries in investment promotes similar post–mating asymmets.
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