• Publications
  • Influence
Ten species in one: DNA barcoding reveals cryptic species in the neotropical skipper butterfly Astraptes fulgerator.
Astraptes fulgerator, first described in 1775, is a common and widely distributed neotropical skipper butterfly (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae). We combine 25 years of natural history observations inExpand
  • 2,755
  • 217
  • PDF
Herbivores and the Number of Tree Species in Tropical Forests
  • D. Janzen
  • Biology
  • The American Naturalist
  • 1 November 1970
A high number of tree species, low density of adults of each species, and long distances between conspecific adults are characteristic of many low-land tropical forest habitats. I propose that theseExpand
  • 3,861
  • 192
Use of DNA barcodes to identify flowering plants.
Methods for identifying species by using short orthologous DNA sequences, known as "DNA barcodes," have been proposed and initiated to facilitate biodiversity studies, identify juveniles, associateExpand
  • 1,503
  • 119
  • PDF
Why Mountain Passes are Higher in the Tropics
  • D. Janzen
  • Geography
  • The American Naturalist
  • 1 May 1967
patry of related populations would therefore tend to increase density of species in a region as a whole. It will be suggested below that this is a factor in the increase of species densities inExpand
  • 1,303
  • 102
  • PDF
DNA barcodes distinguish species of tropical Lepidoptera.
Although central to much biological research, the identification of species is often difficult. The use of DNA barcodes, short DNA sequences from a standardized region of the genome, has recentlyExpand
  • 1,131
  • 83
  • PDF
Seed Predation by Animals
Many plants suffer very heavy preand/or post-dispersal seed predation by animals. A few exemplary studies (2,18,38,52,74,87, 106, 110, 111, 124, 140, 161, 162, 171, 181, 187, 196, 197, 203, 205, 207,Expand
  • 1,708
  • 80
Why Bamboos Wait So Long to Flower
  • 691
  • 65
Strategies in Herbivory by Mammals: The Role of Plant Secondary Compounds
Large herbivores must select food from a wide variety of plant parts, species, and strains. These differ in nutritional value (protein, carbohydrate, etc.), toughness, spinosity, etc. Even greaterExpand
  • 1,237
  • 58
COEVOLUTION OF MUTUALISM BETWEEN ANTS AND ACACIAS IN CENTRAL AMERICA
  • D. Janzen
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution; international journal of organic…
  • 1 September 1966
The purpose of this paper is to discuss the coevolution of one of the more thoroughly studied mutualistic systems in the New World tropics: the interdependency between the swollen-thorn acacias andExpand
  • 828
  • 47
  • PDF
...
1
2
3
4
5
...