• Publications
  • Influence
Ten species in one: DNA barcoding reveals cryptic species in the neotropical skipper butterfly Astraptes fulgerator.
TLDR
The results add to the evidence that cryptic species are prevalent in tropical regions, a critical issue in efforts to document global species richness, and illustrate the value of DNA barcoding, especially when coupled with traditional taxonomic tools, in disclosing hidden diversity.
Herbivores and the Number of Tree Species in Tropical Forests
  • D. Janzen
  • Environmental Science
    The American Naturalist
  • 1 November 1970
TLDR
Any event that increases the efficiency of the predators at eating seeds and seedlings of a given tree species may lead to a reduction in population density of the adults of that species and/or to increased distance between new adults and their parents.
Use of DNA barcodes to identify flowering plants.
TLDR
Comparison of the total plastid genomes of tobacco and deadly nightshade enhanced with trials on widely divergent angiosperm taxa suggest that the sequences in this pair of loci have the potential to discriminate among the largest number of plant species for barcoding purposes.
Why Mountain Passes are Higher in the Tropics
  • D. Janzen
  • Environmental Science
    The American Naturalist
  • 1 May 1967
patry of related populations would therefore tend to increase density of species in a region as a whole. It will be suggested below that this is a factor in the increase of species densities in
DNA barcodes distinguish species of tropical Lepidoptera.
TLDR
It is shown that cytochrome c oxidase I DNA barcodes effectively discriminate among species in three Lepidoptera families from Area de Conservación Guanacaste in northwestern Costa Rica, suggesting DNA barcoding will significantly aid species identification and discovery in tropical settings.
Seed Predation by Animals
TLDR
It is clear that the pattern of seed predation is highly structured and that it co evolved at, the chemical, spatial, and temporal level and the processes and patterns are ideal candidates for ecological and evolu­ tionary analyses.
Strategies in Herbivory by Mammals: The Role of Plant Secondary Compounds
TLDR
Large herbivores must select food from a wide variety of plant parts, species, and strains, and should prefer to feed on foods that contain small amounts of secondary compounds, and their body size and searching strategies should be adapted to optimize the number of types of foods available.
COEVOLUTION OF MUTUALISM BETWEEN ANTS AND ACACIAS IN CENTRAL AMERICA
  • D. Janzen
  • Environmental Science
    Evolution; international journal of organic…
  • 1 September 1966
TLDR
The coevolution of one of the more thoroughly studied mutualistic systems in the New World tropics: the interdependency between the swollen-thorn acacias and their ant inhabitants is discussed.
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