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Chromosomal analysis of DDT-resistance in a long-term selected population of Drosophila melanogaster.
The genetic basis of DDT-resistance was studied in a population of Drosophila melanogaster. This population was unique in that it had been continually selected for DDT-resistance since 1952 and hadExpand
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Measurement of sexual isolation and selective mating.
The recent biological definitions of species by Dobzhansky (1941), Mayr (1942), and others have stressed the attainment of reproductive isolation between two populations as the critical step inExpand
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Migration and gene dispersal in Rana pipiens.
Synopsis. Although the dominant burnsi gene is widely distributed in Minnesota populations of the leopard frog (Rana pipiens) at uniformly low frequencies, estimates of the effective size of theExpand
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SEASONAL SELECTION IN THE LEOPARD FROG, RANA PIPIENS
The leopard frog, Rana pipiens, exists as a polymorphic species in an area of about 100,000 square miles in Minnesota, western Wisconsin, northern Iowa, and northeastern South Dakota (Merrell, 1965).Expand
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A COMPARISON OF THE ESTIMATED SIZE AND THE “EFFECTIVE SIZE” OF BREEDING POPULATIONS OF THE LEOPARD FROG, RANA PIPIENS
  • D. J. Merrell
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution; international journal of organic…
  • 1 June 1968
Sewall Wright has played a key role in advancing the theory of random genetic drift due to small population size (Wright, 1931 and later). The mathematical theory was first developed by Fisher (1930)Expand
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Fecundity, Fertility, and Longevity of DDT‐Resistant and Susceptible Populations of Drosophila Melanogaster
The fecundity, fertility, and longevity of three DDT—resistant populations have been compared with these traits in their corresponding controls. The controls usually showed higher fecundity andExpand
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Selective Mating in Drosophila Melanogaster.
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THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE DOMINANT BURNSI GENE IN THE LEOPARD FROG, RANA PIPIENS
Weed (1922, 1930) tentatively named two new species of frogs from Minnesota. The unspotted type, first described by Dickerson (1906), was called Rana burnsi (Fig. 1); the other type, previouslyExpand
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Evolution and genetics
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SELECTIVE MATING AS A CAUSE OF GENE FREQUENCY CHANGES IN LABORATORY POPULATIONS OF DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER
The results of mating experiments with several sex-linked mutants and the wild type of Drosophila melanogaster have already been published (Merrell, 1949a). If the mating success of the various typesExpand
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