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  • Influence
Radiant Textuality: Literature after the World Wide Web
  • D. Hulle
  • Computer Science
  • Lit. Linguistic Comput.
  • 1 November 2002
  • 123
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Textual Awareness: A Genetic Study of Late Manuscripts by Joyce, Proust, and Mann
Aware of the act of writing as a temporal process, many modernist authors preserved numerous manuscripts of their works, which themselves thematized time. Textual Awareness analyzes the writingExpand
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The Making of Samuel Beckett's 'L'Innommable'/'The Unnamable'
This book analyses the genesis of one of Beckett's most important works, the novel 'L'Innommable'/'The Unnamable', written in French in 1949-50 and translated into English by Beckett in 1956-8.Expand
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Computer-supported collation of modern manuscripts: CollateX and the Beckett Digital Manuscript Project
TLDR
Interoperability is the key term within the framework of the European-funded research project Interedition, whose aim is ‘to encourage the creators of tools for textual scholarship to make their functionality available to others, and to promote communication between scholars so that we can raise awareness of innovative working methods’. Expand
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  • PDF
Samuel Beckett's Library
Acknowledgments Introduction 1. Reading traces: Beckett as a reader 2. Literature in English 3. Literature in French 4. Literature in German 5. Literature in Italian 6. Classics and other literaturesExpand
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Growth and the Grid: Organic vs Constructivist Conceptions of Poetry
Two important types of metaphors have dominated the history of poetics: organic and constructivist metaphors. This article first examines both conceptions by analysing different volumes of poetry inExpand
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The New Cambridge Companion to Samuel Beckett
1. Early Beckett: 'the one looking through his fingers' John Pilling 2. Molloy, Malone Dies, The Unnamable: the novel reshaped Angela Moorjani 3. Still stirrings: Beckett's prose from Texts forExpand
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James Joyce: the study of languages
The Study of Languages is one of James Joyce's first essays and an early indication of his lifelong interest in philology, the focus of this volume of essays. The collection investigates threeExpand
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