• Publications
  • Influence
Recent Research on Selective Exposure to Information
  • D. Frey
  • Biology, Business
    Advances in Experimental Social Psychology
  • 1986
The bystander-effect: a meta-analytic review on bystander intervention in dangerous and non-dangerous emergencies.
TLDR
This meta-analysis integrates the bystander literature from the 1960s to 2010, provides statistical tests of potential moderators, and presents new theoretical and empirical perspectives on the novel finding of non-negative bystander effects in certain dangerous emergencies as well as situations where bystanders are a source of physical support for the potentially intervening individual.
Authentic Leadership: An Empirical Test of Its Antecedents, Consequences, and Mediating Mechanisms
The recent economic crisis as well as other disasters such as the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico or the nuclear disaster in Japan has fanned calls for leaders who do not deny responsibility, hide
Confirmation bias in sequential information search after preliminary decisions: an expansion of dissonance theoretical research on selective exposure to information.
TLDR
The authors show that an even stronger preference for supporting information arises if information is presented and processed sequentially instead of simultaneously, and demonstrate that this stronger confirmation bias is due to sequential presentation and not to sequential processing of information.
Group decision making in hidden profile situations: dissent as a facilitator for decision quality.
The effect of diversity in individual prediscussion preferences on group decision quality was examined in an experiment in which 135 three-person groups worked on a personnel selection case with 4
The Unresponsive Bystander: Are Bystanders More Responsive in Dangerous Emergencies?
Previous research in bystander intervention found that the presence of other bystanders reduces helping behaviour in an emergency (bystander effect). This research was mainly conducted in the context
Biased information search in group decision making.
TLDR
Functional and dysfunctional aspects of biased information seeking in group decision making are discussed and differences between homogeneous and heterogeneous groups reflect group-level processes.
Virtual driving and risk taking: do racing games increase risk-taking cognitions, affect, and behaviors?
TLDR
This study investigated whether playing racing games affects cognitions, affect, and behaviors that can promote risk taking in actual road traffic situations and found that men who played a racing game subsequently took higher risks in computer-simulated criticalRoad traffic situations than did men who play a neutral game.
Biased information search in group decision making.
TLDR
Functional and dysfunctional aspects of biased information seeking in group decision making are discussed and differences between homogeneous and heterogeneous groups reflect group-level processes.
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