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The Complete Capuchin: The Biology of the Genus Cebus
TLDR
This book discusses capuchins in Nature, their taxonomy and distribution with Anthony Rylands, and their role in community ecology and behavioural psychology.
Wild capuchin monkeys (Cebus libidinosus) use anvils and stone pounding tools
TLDR
An exploratory investigation in an area where nut‐cracking by wild capuchin monkeys is common knowledge among local residents finds physical evidence that monkeys cracked nuts on rock outcrops, boulders, and logs (collectively termed anvils).
The Biology of Traditions: Models and Evidence
TLDR
A biology of traditions of traditions in orangutans and chimpanzees: social learning and social tolerance Carel P. van Schaik and Susan Perry.
Prehension in Cebus and Saimiri: I. Grip type and hand preference
TLDR
The presence of varied precision grips in capuchins and no form of precision grip in squirrel monkeys leads to two conclusions: first, a thumb classification of “opposable” (vs. “pseudo‐opposables”) is not essential for precision gripping; and second, the anatomy of the spinal pyramidal tract and neuromuscular interfacing in the hands may be more sensitive gauges of manual dexterity than the anatomyof the thumb.
Fallback foraging as a way of life: using dietary toughness to compare the fallback signal among capuchins and implications for interpreting morphological variation.
TLDR
The toughness of foods exploited by two tufted capuchin species at two ecologically distinct sites is compared; C. apella in a tropical rainforest, and C. libidinosus in a cerrado forest to address whether or not a fallback foraging species exhibits a given suite of morphological and behavioral attributes, regardless of habitat.
Performance in a tool-using task by common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), bonobos (Pan paniscus), an orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus), and capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella).
TLDR
The results indicate that all these species can solve these tasks, however, only the performance of apes is consistent with emerging comprehension of the causal relations required for the avoidance of errors in the more complex tasks.
Socially biased learning in monkeys
TLDR
It is suggested that socially biased learning is always the collective outcome of interacting physical, social, and individual factors, and that differences across populations and species in social bias in learning reflect variations in all these dimensions.
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