• Publications
  • Influence
The hunting handicap: costly signaling in human foraging strategies
Abstract. Humans sometimes forage or distribute the products of foraging in ways that do not maximize individual energetic return rates. As an alternative to hypotheses that rely on reciprocalExpand
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The hunting handicap: costly signaling in human foraging strategies
Humans sometimes forage or distribute the products of foraging in ways that do not maximize indi- vidual energetic return rates. As an alternative to hypoth- eses that rely on reciprocal altruism toExpand
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Delayed Reciprocity and Tolerated Theft: The Behavioral Ecology of Food-Sharing Strategies
  • D. Bird
  • Sociology
  • Current Anthropology
  • 1 February 1997
Models derived from behavioral ecology may have the potential to explain a great deal of variability in food-sharing patterns within and between human societies. We use quantitative observationalExpand
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The “fire stick farming” hypothesis: Australian Aboriginal foraging strategies, biodiversity, and anthropogenic fire mosaics
Aboriginal burning in Australia has long been assumed to be a “resource management” strategy, but no quantitative tests of this hypothesis have ever been conducted. We combine ethnographicExpand
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Hunting and Nuclear Families: Some Lessons from the Hadza about Men's Work
Hadza hunter-gatherers display economic and social features usually assumed to indicate the dependence of wives and children on provisioning husbands and fathers. The wives and children of betterExpand
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Behavioral Ecology and Archaeology
Behavioral ecology is the study of adaptive behavior in relation to social and environmental circumstances. Analysts working from this perspective hold that the reproductive strategies andExpand
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The benefits of costly signaling: Meriam turtle hunters
Hunting, particularly when it involves large game that is extensively shared, has been suggested to serve as a form of costly signaling by hunters, serving to attract mates and allies or to deterExpand
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Why Women Hunt
An old anthropological theory ascribes gender differences in hunter‐gatherer subsistence to an economy of scale in household economic production: women pursue child‐care‐compatible tasks and men, ofExpand
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Constraints of knowing or constraints of growing?
Recent theoretical models suggest that the difference between human and nonhuman primate life-history patterns may be due to a reliance on complex foraging strategies requiring extensive learning.Expand
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Aboriginal hunting buffers climate-driven fire-size variability in Australia’s spinifex grasslands
Across diverse ecosystems, greater climatic variability tends to increase wildfire size, particularly in Australia, where alternating wet–dry cycles increase vegetation growth, only to leave a dryExpand
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