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The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-frequency, high-acceleration rotations was studied in five squirrel monkeys with intact vestibular function. The VOR evoked by steps of acceleration in darkness (3,000 degrees /s(2) reaching a velocity of 150 degrees /s) began after a latency of 7.3 +/- 1.5 ms (mean +/- SD). Gain of the(More)
Extracellular recordings were made from vestibular-nerve afferents innervating the semicircular canals in anesthetized C57BL/6 mice ranging in age from 4-24 weeks. A normalized coefficient of variation was used to divide afferents into regular (CV*<0.1) and irregular (CV*>0.1) groups. There were three overall conclusions from this study. First, mouse(More)
Mammalian vestibular-nerve afferents innervating the semicircular canals have been divided into groups according to their discharge regularity, gain at 2-Hz rotational stimulation, and morphology. Low-gain irregular afferents terminate in calyx endings in the central crista, high-gain irregular afferents synapse more peripherally in dimorphic (bouton and(More)
The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-frequency, high-acceleration rotations was studied in four squirrel monkeys after unilateral plugging of the three semicircular canals. During the period (1-4 days) that animals were kept in darkness after plugging, the gain during steps of acceleration (3, 000 degrees /s(2), peak velocity =(More)
The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-frequency, high-acceleration rotations was studied in four squirrel monkeys after unilateral labyrinthectomy. Spontaneous nystagmus was measured at the beginning and end of each testing session. During the period that animals were kept in darkness (4 days), the nystagmus at each of these(More)
The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by sinusoidal rotations from 0.5 to 15 Hz and acceleration steps up to 3,000 degrees /s(2) to 150 degrees /s was studied in six squirrel monkeys following adaptation with x2.2 magnifying and x0.45 minimizing spectacles. For sinusoidal rotations with peak velocities of 20 degrees /s, there were(More)
The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) acts to maintain images stable on the retina by rotating the eyes in exactly the opposite direction, but with equal magnitude, to head velocity. When viewing a near target, this reflex has an increased response to compensate for the translation of the eyes relative to the target that acts to reduce retinal image slip.(More)
The horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) evoked by passive, high-acceleration, head-on-body rotations (head thrusts) while viewing a far (124-cm) or near (15-cm) target was recorded (scleral search coil) in four subjects with normal vestibular function and in one subject with unilateral vestibular hypofunction. For responses in the subjects with normal(More)
Previous work in squirrel monkeys has demonstrated the presence of linear and nonlinear components to the horizontal vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-acceleration rotations. The nonlinear component is seen as a rise in gain with increasing velocity of rotation at frequencies more than 2 Hz (a velocity-dependent gain enhancement). We have shown(More)
In mammals, vestibular-nerve afferents that innervate only type I hair cells (calyx-only afferents) respond nearly in phase with head acceleration for high-frequency motion, whereas afferents that innervate both type I and type II (dimorphic) or only type II (bouton-only) hair cells respond more in phase with head velocity. Afferents that exhibit irregular(More)