D. M. Lasker

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The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-frequency, high-acceleration rotations was studied in five squirrel monkeys with intact vestibular function. The VOR evoked by steps of acceleration in darkness (3,000 degrees /s(2) reaching a velocity of 150 degrees /s) began after a latency of 7.3 +/- 1.5 ms (mean +/- SD). Gain of the(More)
The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-frequency, high-acceleration rotations was studied in four squirrel monkeys after unilateral labyrinthectomy. Spontaneous nystagmus was measured at the beginning and end of each testing session. During the period that animals were kept in darkness (4 days), the nystagmus at each of these(More)
Extracellular recordings were made from vestibular–nerve afferents innervating the semicircular canals in anesthetized C57BL/6 mice ranging in age from 4–24 weeks. A normalized coefficient of variation was used to divide afferents into regular (CV* < 0.1) and irregular (CV* > 0.1) groups. There were three overall conclusions from this study. First, mouse(More)
Mammalian vestibular-nerve afferents innervating the semicircular canals have been divided into groups according to their discharge regularity, gain at 2-Hz rotational stimulation, and morphology. Low-gain irregular afferents terminate in calyx endings in the central crista, high-gain irregular afferents synapse more peripherally in dimorphic (bouton and(More)
The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-frequency, high-acceleration rotations was studied in four squirrel monkeys after unilateral plugging of the three semicircular canals. During the period (1-4 days) that animals were kept in darkness after plugging, the gain during steps of acceleration (3, 000 degrees /s(2), peak velocity =(More)
The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by sinusoidal rotations from 0.5 to 15 Hz and acceleration steps up to 3,000 degrees /s(2) to 150 degrees /s was studied in six squirrel monkeys following adaptation with x2.2 magnifying and x0.45 minimizing spectacles. For sinusoidal rotations with peak velocities of 20 degrees /s, there were(More)
The horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) evoked by passive, high-acceleration, head-on-body rotations (head thrusts) while viewing a far (124-cm) or near (15-cm) target was recorded (scleral search coil) in four subjects with normal vestibular function and in one subject with unilateral vestibular hypofunction. For responses in the subjects with normal(More)
Unilateral vestibular lesions cause marked asymmetry in the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during rapid head rotations, with VOR gain being lower for head rotations toward the lesion than for rotations in the opposite direction. Reducing this gain asymmetry by enhancing ipsilesional responses would be an important step toward improving gaze(More)
Previous work in squirrel monkeys has demonstrated the presence of linear and nonlinear components to the horizontal vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-acceleration rotations. The nonlinear component is seen as a rise in gain with increasing velocity of rotation at frequencies more than 2 Hz (a velocity-dependent gain enhancement). We have shown(More)
The aim of this study was to determine if the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in response to pitch, roll, left anterior–right posterior (LARP), and right anterior–left posterior (RALP) head rotations exhibited the same linear and nonlinear characteristics as those found in the horizontal VOR. Three-dimensional eye movements were recorded with the(More)