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During surface-initiated blood coagulation in vitro, activated factor XII (fXIIa) converts factor XI (fXI) to fXIa. Whereas fXI deficiency is associated with a hemorrhagic disorder, factor XII deficiency is not, suggesting that fXI can be activated by other mechanisms in vivo. Thrombin activates fXI, and several studies suggest that fXI promotes coagulation(More)
Factor XI is the zymogen of a plasma protease produced primarily in liver that is required for normal blood coagulation. We cloned approximately 2600 base pairs of the human factor XI gene upstream of exon one, identified transcription start sites, and conducted a functional analysis. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrate that the 381 base pairs upstream(More)
The bleeding disorder associated with factor XI (fXI) deficiency is typically inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. However, some fXI mutations may be associated with dominant disease transmission. FXI is a homodimer, a feature that could allow certain mutations to exert a dominant-negative effect on wild-type fXI secretion through heterodimer(More)
The bleeding diathesis associated with hereditary factor XI (fXI) deficiency is prevalent in Ashkenazi Jews, in whom the disorder appears to be an autosomal recessive condition. The homodimeric structure of fXI implies that the product of a single mutant allele could confer disease in a dominant manner through formation of heterodimers with wild-type(More)
The coagulation protease zymogen factor (F)XI is a disulfide bond-linked homodimer, a configuration that is necessary for protein secretion and function. The non-catalytic portion of the FXI polypeptide contains four repeats called apple domains (A1-A4). It is clear that FXI A4 plays a key role in dimer formation, however, the importance of other apple(More)
During surface-initiated blood coagulation in vitro, activated factor XII (fXIIa) converts factor XI (fXI) to fXIa. Whereas fXI deficiency is associated with a hemorrhagic disorder, factor XII deficiency is not, suggesting that fXI can be activated by other mechanisms in vivo. Thrombin activates fXI, and several studies suggest that fXI promotes coagulation(More)
The bleeding disorder associated with factor XI (fXI) deficiency is typically inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. However, some fXI mutations may be associated with dominant disease transmission. FXI is a homodimer, a feature that could allow certain mutations to exert a dominant negative effect on wild type fXI secretion through heterodimer(More)
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