Learn More
In December 1997 the European Commission (EC) adopted Directive 97/69/EC (O.J. L 343/19 of 13 December 1997) in which criteria were established for the classification and labeling of synthetic mineral fibers. This directive was derived based upon an extensive program evaluating current scientific knowledge on fiber pathogenicity and its relationship to the(More)
In December 1997 the European Commission (EC) adopted Directive 97/69/EC (O.J. L 343/19 of 13 December 1997), in which criteria were established for the classification and labeling of synthetic mineral fibers. This directive was derived based upon an extensive program evaluating current scientific knowledge on fiber pathogenicity and its relationship to the(More)
This review addresses the characteristics which differentiate synthetic vitreous fibers (SVFs, e.g., fiber glass, stonewool, slagwool, refractory ceramic fibers, etc.), how these influence the potential biopersistence and toxicity, the most recent epidemiological results and the integration of these findings into the health and safety regulations in Europe(More)
The differences between chrysotile asbestos, a serpentine mineral, and amphibole asbestos have been debated extensively. Many studies have shown that chrysotile is cleared from the lung more rapidly than amphibole. In order to quantify the comparative clearance of chrysotile and the amphibole asbestos tremolite, both fibers were evaluated in an inhalation(More)
This working group report is the product of the joint efforts of the members of an expert working group organized and convened by the International Life Sciences Institute Risk Science Institute. All members of the working group contributed by drafting various sections of the report. The final report emerged from extensive discussions and revisions by the(More)
Chrysotile asbestos is often included with other asbestos materials in evaluation and classification. However, chrysotile is a serpentine with markedly different physical and chemical characteristics in comparison to amphiboles (e.g., crocidolite, amosite, tremolite). In contrast to amphiboles, which are solid, rodlike fibers, chrysotile is composed like a(More)
With the initial understanding of the relationship of asbestos to disease, little information was available on whether the two different groups of minerals that are called asbestos were of similar or different potency in causing disease. Asbestos was often described as a durable fiber that if inhaled would remain in the lung and cause disease. It has been(More)
Cloud Computing is a term applied to large, hosted datacenters, usually geographically distributed, which offer various computational services on a “utility” basis. Clouds are most often serving Developers or Businesses, or Large Enterprises as a new way to host applications. These applications are usually delivered to client PC’s or(More)
Chrysotile asbestos, a serpentine mineral, has been shown to be notably different from amphibole asbestos such as amosite, crocidolite, and tremolite in that chrysotile once inhaled is rapidly removed from the lung while the amphiboles persist. This has been demonstrated for three different chrysotile samples from Canada, the United States, and Brazil. The(More)
This 3-mo inhalation study investigated the biological effects of a special-purpose glass microfiber (E-glass microfiber), the stone wool fiber MMVF21, and a new high-temperature application fiber (calcium-magnesium-silicate fiber, CMS) in Wistar rats. Rats were exposed 6 h/day, 5 days/wk for 3 mo to fiber aerosol concentrations of approximately 15, 50, and(More)