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To facilitate understanding of, and access to, the information available for protein structures, we have constructed the Structural Classification of Proteins (scop) database. This database provides a detailed and comprehensive description of the structural and evolutionary relationships of the proteins of known structure. It also provides for each entry(More)
The Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database provides a detailed and comprehensive description of the relationships of known protein structures. The classification is on hierarchical levels: the first two levels, family and superfamily, describe near and distant evolutionary relationships; the third, fold, describes geometrical relationships.(More)
The Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database is a comprehensive ordering of all proteins of known structure, according to their evolutionary and structural relationships. Protein domains in SCOP are hierarchically classified into families, superfamilies, folds and classes. The continual accumulation of sequence and structural data allows more(More)
Of the sequence comparison methods, profile-based methods perform with greater selectively than those that use pairwise comparisons. Of the profile methods, hidden Markov models (HMMs) are apparently the best. The first part of this paper describes calculations that (i) improve the performance of HMMs and (ii) determine a good procedure for creating HMMs(More)
The Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database is a comprehensive ordering of all proteins of known structure, according to their evolutionary and structural relationships. The SCOP hierarchy comprises the following levels: Species, Protein, Family, Superfamily, Fold and Class. While keeping the original classification scheme intact, we have(More)
Homologous proteins have regions which retain the same general fold and regions where the folds differ. For pairs of distantly related proteins (residue identity approximately 20%), the regions with the same fold may comprise less than half of each molecule. The regions with the same general fold differ in structure by amounts that increase as the amino(More)
The non-covalent assembly of proteins that fold separately is central to many biological processes, and differs from the permanent macromolecular assembly of protein subunits in oligomeric proteins. We performed an analysis of the atomic structure of the recognition sites seen in 75 protein-protein complexes of known three-dimensional structure: 24(More)
The sequences of related proteins can diverge beyond the point where their relationship can be recognised by pairwise sequence comparisons. In attempts to overcome this limitation, methods have been developed that use as a query, not a single sequence, but sets of related sequences or a representation of the characteristics shared by related sequences. Here(More)
Pairwise sequence comparison methods have been assessed using proteins whose relationships are known reliably from their structures and functions, as described in the SCOP database [Murzin, A. G., Brenner, S. E., Hubbard, T. & Chothia C. (1995) J. Mol. Biol. 247, 536-540]. The evaluation tested the programs BLAST [Altschul, S. F., Gish, W., Miller, W.,(More)
Only a small proportion of the mouse genome is transcribed into mature messenger RNA transcripts. There is an international collaborative effort to identify all full-length mRNA transcripts from the mouse, and to ensure that each is represented in a physical collection of clones. Here we report the manual annotation of 60,770 full-length mouse complementary(More)