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The τ pathology found in Alzheimer disease (AD) is crucial in cognitive decline. Midlife development of obesity, a major risk factor of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, increases the risk of dementia and AD later in life. The impact of obesity on AD risk has been suggested to be related to central insulin resistance, secondary to peripheral insulin(More)
Tau pathology is encountered in many neurodegenerative disorders known as tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease. Physical activity is a lifestyle factor affecting processes crucial for memory and synaptic plasticity. Whether long-term voluntary exercise has an impact on Tau pathology and its pathophysiological consequences is currently unknown. To(More)
While the spatiotemporal development of Tau pathology has been correlated with occurrence of cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's patients, mechanisms underlying these deficits remain unclear. Both brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its tyrosine kinase receptor TrkB play a critical role in hippocampus-dependent synaptic plasticity and memory. When(More)
Tau pathology found in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is crucial in cognitive decline. Epidemiologic evidences support that habitual caffeine intake prevents memory decline during aging and reduces the risk to develop Alzheimer's disease. So far, experimental studies addressed the impact of caffeine in models mimicking the amyloid pathology of AD. However, in(More)
Consumption of caffeine, a non-selective adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonist, reduces the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) in humans and mitigates both amyloid and Tau burden in transgenic mouse models. However, the impact of selective A2AR blockade on the progressive development of AD-related lesions and associated memory impairments has(More)
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by extracellular accumulation of amyloid deposits and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) composed of hyperphosphorylated Tau proteins. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophic factor playing a critical role in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and memory and(More)
Tau is a central player in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related Tauopathies, where it is found as aggregates in degenerating neurons. Abnormal post-translational modifications, such as truncation, are likely involved in the pathological process. A major step forward in understanding the role of Tau truncation would be to identify the precise cleavage sites(More)
The t pathology found in Alzheimer disease (AD) is crucial in cognitive decline. Midlife development of obesity, a major risk factor of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, increases the risk of dementia and AD later in life. The impact of obesity on AD risk has been suggested to be related to central insulin resistance , secondary to peripheral insulin(More)
Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the combined presence of amyloid plaques and tau pathology, the latter being correlated with the progression of clinical symptoms. Neuroinflammatory changes are thought to be major contributors to Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology, even if their precise role still remains largely debated. Notably, to what extent(More)
Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is one of the most common B-cell malignancies in adults, characterized by an accumulation of monoclonal CD5 + mature B cells in lymphoid tissues and peripheral blood. 1 The complex interplay between malignant CLL cells and their surrounding bystander tumor microenviron-ment (TME) 2 is critical for their survival and(More)