Cynthia D. Huebner

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a Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1630 Linden Drive, Madison, WI 53706, United States b Earth System Analysis, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), P.O. Box 60 12 03, Telegraphenberg A62, D-14412 Potsdam, Germany c Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biología Vegetal (IMBIV-CONICET), and Facultad de(More)
Understanding the factors related to invasive exotic species distributions at broad spatial scales has important theoretical and management implications, because biological invasions are detrimental to many ecosystem functions and processes. Housing development facilitates invasions by disturbing land cover, introducing nonnative landscaping plants, and(More)
Forests throughout the US are invaded by non-native invasive plants. Rural housing may contribute to non-native plant invasions by introducing plants via landscaping, and by creating habitat conditions favorable for invaders. The objective of this paper was to test the hypothesis that rural housing is a significant factor explaining the distribution of(More)
Establishment of Microstegium vimineum, an invasive exotic grass, in closed-canopy U.S. eastern forests was evaluated across a local (roadside to forest interior) and regional (across two geographic provinces) environmental gradient in West Virginia. The two geographic provinces were the Allegheny Plateau (more mesic) and the Ridge and Valley Province (more(More)
High species richness, resource availability and disturbance are community characteristics associated with forest invasibility. We categorized commonly measured community variables, including species composition, topography, and landscape features, within both mature and 15-year-old clearcuts in West Virginia, USA. We evaluated the importance of each(More)
Spread of Microstegium vimineum, an invasive exotic grass, in closed-canopy forests of West Virginia, U.S. was evaluated across a local (roadside to forest interior) and regional (across two geographic provinces) environmental gradient. Seed dispersal distances from roadside populations into forest interiors based on seed rain and soil seed bank data were(More)
A soil fertility gradient, ranging from infertile to highly fertile soils, may define whether or not a plant will establish and spread at a site. We evaluated whether or not such a fertility gradient exists for Rosa multiflora Thunb., a nonnative invasive shrub, and Kalmia latifolia L., a native problem shrub, in closed-canopy forests of the eastern U.S. We(More)
The landscape of central Arizona U.S.A. is characterized by a patchy distribution of three major vegetation types: chaparral, woodland and grassland. Disturbance is common in the landscape, primarily livestock grazing, fire and conversion (i.e., removal of woody plants to increase forage for livestock). The purposes of this research were to determine(More)