Crystal L. Kahn

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MOTIVATION Segmental duplications > 1 kb in length with >or= 90% sequence identity between copies comprise nearly 5% of the human genome. They are frequently found in large, contiguous regions known as duplication blocks that can contain mosaic patterns of thousands of segmental duplications. Reconstructing the evolutionary history of these complex genomic(More)
MOTIVATION Segmental duplications are common in mammalian genomes, but their evolutionary origins remain mysterious. A major difficulty in analyzing segmental duplications is that many duplications are complex mosaics of fragments of numerous other segmental duplications. RESULTS We introduce a novel measure called duplication distance that describes the(More)
Segmental duplications are abundant in the human genome, but their evolutionary history is not well-understood. The mystery surrounding them is due in part to their complex organization; many segmental duplications are mosaic patterns of smaller repeated segments, or duplicons. A two-step model of duplication has been proposed to explain these mosaic(More)
Many cancer genome sequencing efforts are underway with the goal of identifying the somatic mutations that drive cancer progression. A major difficulty in these studies is that tumors are typically heterogeneous, with individual cells in a tumor having different complements of somatic mutations. However, nearly all DNA sequencing technologies sequence DNA(More)
BACKGROUND Segmental duplications, or low-copy repeats, are common in mammalian genomes. In the human genome, most segmental duplications are mosaics comprised of multiple duplicated fragments. This complex genomic organization complicates analysis of the evolutionary history of these sequences. One model proposed to explain this mosaic patterns is a(More)
Segmental duplications, or low-copy repeats, are common in mammalian genomes. In the human genome, most segmental duplications are mosaics consisting of pieces of multiple other segmental duplications. This complex genomic organization complicates analysis of the evolutionary history of these sequences. Earlier, we introduced a genomic distance, called(More)
  • Kahn, Crystal L Kahn, Sc M, Benjamin J Date, Raphael, Date Bernard Moret +6 others
  • 2010
The human genome exhibits a rich structure resulting from a long history of genomic changes, including single base-pair mutations and larger scale rearrangements such as inversions , deletions, translocations, and duplications. The number and order of the genomic changes that resulted in the present-day human genome is not known, but can sometimes be(More)
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