Cristian Danescu-Niculescu-Mizil

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Understanding social interaction within groups is key to analyzing online communities. Most current work focuses on structural properties: who talks to whom, and how such interactions form larger network structures. The interactions themselves, however, generally take place in the form of natural language --- either spoken or written --- and one could(More)
We report on work in progress on extracting lexical simplifications (e.g., “collaborate” → “work together”), focusing on utilizing edit histories in Simple English Wikipedia for this task. We consider two main approaches: (1) deriving simplification probabilities via an edit model that accounts for a mixture of different operations, and (2) using metadata(More)
There are many on-line settings in which users publicly express opinions. A number of these offer mechanisms for other users to evaluate these opinions; a canonical example is Amazon.com, where reviews come with annotations like "26 of 32 people found the following review helpful." Opinion evaluation appears in many off-line settings as well, including(More)
Vibrant online communities are in constant flux. As members join and depart, the interactional norms evolve, stimulating further changes to the membership and its social dynamics. Linguistic change --- in the sense of innovation that becomes accepted as the norm --- is essential to this dynamic process: it both facilitates individual expression and fosters(More)
We propose a computational framework for identifying linguistic aspects of politeness. Our starting point is a new corpus of requests annotated for politeness, which we use to evaluate aspects of politeness theory and to uncover new interactions between politeness markers and context. These findings guide our construction of a classifier with(More)
The psycholinguistic theory of communication accommodation accounts for the general observation that participants in conversations tend to converge to one another's communicative behavior: they coordinate in a variety of dimensions including choice of words, syntax, utterance length, pitch and gestures. In its almost forty years of existence, this theory(More)
Unbiased language is a requirement for reference sources like encyclopedias and scientific texts. Bias is, nonetheless, ubiquitous, making it crucial to understand its nature and linguistic realization and hence detect bias automatically. To this end we analyze real instances of human edits designed to remove bias from Wikipedia articles. The analysis(More)
Conversational participants tend to immediately and unconsciously adapt to each other’s language styles: a speaker will even adjust the number of articles and other function words in their next utterance in response to the number in their partner’s immediately preceding utterance. This striking level of coordination is thought to have arisen as a way to(More)
Discussion threads form a central part of the experience on many Web sites, including social networking sites such as Facebook and Google Plus and knowledge creation sites such as Wikipedia. To help users manage the challenge of allocating their attention among the discussions that are relevant to them, there has been a growing need for the algorithmic(More)
Requests are at the core of many social media systems such as question & answer sites and online philanthropy communities. While the success of such requests is critical to the success of the community, the factors that lead community members to satisfy a request are largely unknown. Success of a request depends on factors like who is asking, how they are(More)