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Recent studies have described malignant stem cells as central to the initiation, growth, and potential relapse of acute and chronic myelogenous leukemia (AML and CML). Because of their important role in pathogenesis, rare and biologically distinct leukemia stem cells (LSCs) represent a critical target for therapeutic intervention. However, to date, very few(More)
At a meeting of the Translation Research Program of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group held in early 2008, attendees focused on updating the current state of knowledge in cancer stem cell research and discussing ways in which this knowledge can be translated into clinical use across all disease sites. This report summarizes the major topics discussed and(More)
Human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is thought to arise from a rare population of malignant stem cells. Cells of this nature, herein referred to as leukemic stem cells (LSCs), have been documented for nearly all AML subtypes and appear to fulfill the criteria for stem cells in that they are self-renewing and give rise to the cells found in many leukemic(More)
Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is typically a disease of stem progenitor cell origin. Interestingly, the leukemic stem cell (LSC) shares many characteristics with normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) including the ability to self-renew and a predominantly G(0) cell-cycle status. Thus, although conventional chemotherapy regimens often ablate actively(More)
Recent studies suggest that the population of malignant cells found in human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) arises from a rare population of leukemic stem cells (LSCs). LSCs have been documented for nearly all AML subtypes and have been phenotypically described as CD34+/CD38- or CD34+/HLA-DR-. Given the potentially critical role of these primitive cells(More)
Increasing evidence indicates that malignant stem cells are important for the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and represent a reservoir of cells that drive the development of AML and relapse. Therefore, new treatment regimens are necessary to prevent relapse and improve therapeutic outcomes. Previous studies have shown that the(More)
Chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) can progress from a slow growing chronic phase to an aggressive blast crisis phase, but the molecular basis of this transition remains poorly understood. Here we have used mouse models of CML to show that disease progression is regulated by the Musashi-Numb signalling axis. Specifically, we find that the chronic phase is(More)
In this work, effects of bortezomib on apoptosis, clonal progenitor growth, cytokine production, and NF-κB expression in patients with MDS with cytopenias requiring transfusion support are examined. Bortezomib increased apoptosis in marrow mononuclear cells but had no effects on CFU-GM, BFU-E, or CFU-L content. No consistent effects on NF-κB activation in(More)
Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) resides latently in hematopoietic cells of the bone marrow. Although viral genomes can be found in CD14+ monocytes and CD34+ progenitor cells, the primary reservoir for latent cytomegalovirus is unknown. We analyzed human hematopoietic subpopulations infected in vitro with a recombinant virus that expresses a green fluorescent(More)