Coumaran Egile

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To propel itself in infected cells, the pathogen Shigella flexneri subverts the Cdc42-controlled machinery responsible for actin assembly during filopodia formation. Using a combination of bacterial motility assays in platelet extracts with Escherichia coli expressing the Shigella IcsA protein and in vitro analysis of reconstituted systems from purified(More)
Cortactin, a filamentous actin (F-actin)-associated protein and prominent substrate of Src, is implicated in progression of breast tumours through gene amplification at chromosome 11q13. However, the function of cortactin remains obscure. Here we show that cortactin co-localizes with the Arp2/3 complex, a de novo actin nucleator, at dynamic particulate(More)
Motile and morphogenetic cellular processes are driven by site-directed assembly of actin filaments. Formins, proteins characterized by formin homology domains FH1 and FH2, are initiators of actin assembly. How formins simply bind to filament barbed ends in rapid equilibrium or find free energy to become a processive motor of filament assembly remains(More)
The spreading ability of Shigella flexneri, a facultative intracellular Gram-negative bacterium, within the host-cell cytoplasm is the result of directional assembly and accumulation of actin filaments at one pole of the bacterium. IcsA/VirG, the 120 kDa outer membrane protein that is required for intracellular motility, is located at the pole of the(More)
Listeria monocytogenes, Shigella flexneri, and Rickettsia conorii are three bacterial pathogens that are able to polymerize actin into 'comet tail' structures and move within the cytosol of infected cells. The actin-based motilities of L. monocytogenes and S. flexneri are known to require the bacterial proteins ActA and IcsA, respectively, and several(More)
Actin polymerization, the main driving force for cell locomotion, is also used by the bacteria Listeria and Shigella and vaccinia virus for intracellular and intercellular movements. Seminal studies have shown the key function of the Arp2/3 complex in nucleating actin and generating a branched array of actin filaments during membrane extension and pathogen(More)
The actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex mediates the formation of branched actin filaments at the leading edge of motile cells and in the comet tails moving certain intracellular pathogens. Crystal structures of the Arp2/3 complex are available, but the architecture of the junction formed by the Arp2/3 complex at the base of the branch was not known.(More)
IQGAP1 is a conserved modular protein overexpressed in cancer and involved in organizing actin and microtubules in motile processes such as adhesion, migration, and cytokinesis. A variety of proteins have been shown to interact with IQGAP1, including the small G proteins Rac1 and Cdc42, actin, calmodulin, beta-catenin, the microtubule plus end-binding(More)
The seven-subunit Arp2/3 complex choreographs the formation of branched actin networks at the leading edge of migrating cells. When activated by Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASp), the Arp2/3 complex initiates actin filament branches from the sides of existing filaments. Electron cryomicroscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction of Acanthamoeba(More)
Proteins of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASp) family connect signaling pathways to the actin polymerization-driven cell motility. The ubiquitous homolog of WASp, N-WASp, is a multidomain protein that interacts with the Arp2/3 complex and G-actin via its C-terminal WA domain to stimulate actin polymerization. The activity of N-WASp is enhanced by(More)