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Polycomb response elements (PREs) are specific cis-regulatory sequences needed for transcriptional repression of HOX and other target genes by Polycomb group (PcG) proteins. Among the many PcG proteins known in Drosophila, Pho is the only sequence-specific DNA-binding protein. To gain insight into the function of Pho, we purified Pho protein complexes from(More)
Polycomb group proteins (PcG) repress homeotic genes in cells where these genes must remain inactive during Drosophila and vertebrate development. This repression depends on cis-acting silencer sequences, called Polycomb group response elements (PREs). Pleiohomeotic (Pho), the only known sequence-specific DNA-binding PcG protein, binds to PREs but pho(More)
Polycomb group (PcG) proteins repress homeotic genes in cells where these genes must remain inactive during development. This repression requires cis-acting silencers, also called PcG response elements. Currently, these silencers are ill-defined sequences and it is not known how PcG proteins associate with DNA. Here, we show that the Drosophila PcG protein(More)
Dystroglycan localizes to the basal domain of epithelial cells and has been reported to play a role in apical-basal polarity. Here, we show that Dystroglycan null mutant follicle cells have normal apical-basal polarity, but lose the planar polarity of their basal actin stress fibers, a phenotype it shares with Dystrophin mutants. However, unlike Dystrophin(More)
Gene duplication and divergence is widely considered to be a fundamental mechanism for generating evolutionary novelties. The Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) are a diverse family of signalling molecules found in all metazoan genomes that have evolved by duplication and divergence from a small number of ancestral types. In the fruit fly Drosophila, there(More)
Polycomb group (PcG) proteins repress homeotic genes and other developmental regulatory genes in cells where these genes must remain inactive during development. In Drosophila and in vertebrates, PcG proteins exist in two distinct multiprotein complexes, the Esc/Eed-E(z) complex and PRC1. Drosophila PRC1 contains Polycomb, Posterior sexcombs and(More)
Polycomb group (PcG) genes encode evolutionarily conserved transcriptional repressors that are required for the long-term silencing of particular developmental control genes in animals and plants. PcG genes were first identified in Drosophila as regulators that keep HOX genes inactive in cells where these genes must remain silent during development. Here,(More)
We have revealed a reorientation of ectodomain I of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR; ErbB1; Her1) in living CHO cells expressing the receptor, upon binding of the native ligand EGF. The state of the unliganded, nonactivated EGFR was compared to that exhibited after ligand addition in the presence of a kinase inhibitor that prevents endocytosis(More)
Microscopy has been a very powerful tool for Drosophila research since its inception, proving to be essential for the evaluation of mutant phenotypes, the understanding of cellular and tissue physiology, and the illumination of complex biological questions. In this article we review the breadth of this field, making note of some of the seminal papers. We(More)
Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are synthesized as proproteins that undergo proteolytic processing by furin/subtilisin proprotein convertases to release the active ligand. Here we study processing of BMP5/6/7/8 proteins, including the Drosophila orthologs Glass Bottom Boat (Gbb) and Screw (Scw) and human BMP7. Gbb and Scw have three functional(More)