Colin Pritchard

Learn More
OBJECTIVE To compare estimates of the occurrence of shoulder pain according to (a) different approaches to defining 'shoulder' and (b) restricting the definition to only include those with associated disability. METHODS A postal questionnaire survey was sent to a sample of 500 patients registered with a general practice in south Manchester. After(More)
Prevalence studies suggest that shoulder pain is very common (7-20%) in the adult population, though little is known about the severity and impact of such pain. Disability results, in part, from the restriction of movement and we therefore determined the frequency of restricted shoulder movement in individuals in a general population sample reporting(More)
OBJECTIVES To determine, in a population based study, the influence of occupational factors on the occurrence of shoulder pain and disability. METHODS A random sample of patients was selected from the register of a general practice in the Greater Manchester area of the United Kingdom. Information was collected by a posted questionnaire with specific(More)
INTRODUCTION Pain is the commonest reason that patients present to an emergency department (ED), but it is often not treated effectively. Patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is used in other hospital settings but there is little evidence to support its use in emergency patients. We describe two randomised trials aiming to compare PCA to nurse titrated(More)
INTRODUCTION Over 16 000 mastectomies are performed in England and Wales annually. Acute postoperative pain and nausea are common. The most frequently occurring long-term complications are chronic pain (up to 50%) and reduced shoulder function (reported at 35%). Regional techniques that improve acute postoperative pain relief may reduce the incidence of(More)
OBJECTIVE To determine whether patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is better than routine care in patients presenting to emergency departments with moderate to severe pain from traumatic injuries. DESIGN Pragmatic, multicentre, parallel group, randomised controlled trial. SETTING Five English hospitals. PARTICIPANTS 200 adults (71% (n = 142) male),(More)
OBJECTIVE To determine whether patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is better than routine care in providing effective analgesia for patients presenting to emergency departments with moderate to severe non-traumatic abdominal pain. DESIGN Pragmatic, multicentre, parallel group, randomised controlled trial SETTING Five English hospitals. PARTICIPANTS 200(More)
  • 1