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BACKGROUND Phagocytosis of cells undergoing apoptosis is essential during development, cellular turnover, and wound healing. Failure to promptly clear apoptotic cells has been linked to autoimmune disorders. C. elegans CED-12 and mammalian ELMO are evolutionarily conserved scaffolding proteins that play a critical role in engulfment from worm to human. ELMO(More)
The macrophage is well established as a target of HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection and a major contributor to the neuropathogenesis of AIDS. However, the identification of distinct subpopulations of monocyte/macrophages that carry virus to the brain and that sustain infection within the central nervous system (CNS) has not been(More)
The members of the Dock180 superfamily of proteins are novel guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEF) for Rho family GTPases and are linked to multiple biological processes from worms to mammals. ELMO is a critical regulator of Dock180, and the Dock180-ELMO complex functions as a bipartite GEF for Rac. We identified a mechanism wherein the PH domain of(More)
The recognition of naturally occurring rhadinoviruses in macaque monkeys has spurred interest in their use as models for human infection with Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (human herpesvirus 8). Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) and pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina) were inoculated intravenously with rhadinovirus isolates derived from these(More)
Neonatal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection usually occurs intrapartum or postpartum and results in a higher incidence of neurological dysfunction than is seen in adults. To explore the neuropathogenesis of neonatal HIV infection, we infected neonatal macaques with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and followed the course of infection focusing(More)
Emerging data indicate that chemokine receptors on neurons and glia in the central nervous system (CNS) play a role in normal CNS development, intercellular communication, and the neuropathogenesis of AIDS. To further understand chemokine receptors in the brain and explore their potential role in HIV neuropathogenesis, particularly in pediatrics, we(More)
The pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus transmission via the rectal route remains poorly understood. By use of the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-rhesus macaque model and intrarectal inoculation with pathogenic SIVmac251, a significant increase was found in the percentage of CD11b(+) monocyte lineage cells expressing HLA-DR and/or B7-2 in(More)
The macrophage is well established as a target of HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection and a major contributor to the neuropathogenesis of AIDS. However, the identification of distinct subpopulations of monocyte/macrophages that carry virus to the brain and that sustain infection within the central nervous system (CNS) has not been(More)
The SH3 and SH2 domains of hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck) play important roles in substrate targeting. To identify new components of Hck signaling pathways, we identified proteins that bind to the SH3 domain of Hck (Scott et al. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 28238). One such protein was ELMO1, the mammalian orthologue of the Caenorhabditis elegans gene,(More)
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