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Natural killer (NK) cells can spontaneously lyse certain virally infected and transformed cells. However, early in immune responses NK cells are further activated and recruited to tissue sites where they perform effector functions. This process is dependent on cytokines, but it is unclear if it is regulated by NK cell recognition of susceptible target(More)
By using mice genomically lacking IFN-gammaR, IL-12, perforin, and recombination-activating gene-1 (RAG-1), we analyzed the regulation and importance of IFN-gamma in the control of infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae. IL-12 participates in resistance of mice to C. pneumoniae, probably by regulating the protective levels of IFN-gamma mRNA. In turn, IFN-gamma(More)
Resistance to the Leishmaniae is associated with interferon (IFN)-gamma mediated activation of macrophages. In this study, Balb/c mice were infected with three Leishmania strains that cause progressively growing cutaneous lesions without obvious dissemination: L. mexicana mexicana giving rise to rapidly growing lesions, and L. (Viannia) panamensis and L.(More)
Control of Trypanosoma cruzi infection depends largely upon the production of interferon (IFN)-gamma. During experimental infection this cytokine is produced early, mainly by natural killer (NK) cells and later by T cells. As NK cells have been reported to participate in defence against T. cruzi, it is of importance to study the regulation of NK cell(More)
Natural killer (NK) cells can spontaneously lyse certain virally infected and transformed cells. However, early in immune responses NK cells are further activated and recruited to tissue sites where they perform effector functions. This process is dependent on cytokines, but it is unclear if it is regulated by NK cell recognition of susceptible target(More)
Early immunological activation involves an initial phase of cytokine activity and involvement of cell types such as NK cells. Such early immune responses are often decisive in resolution of microbial infection. NK cells reduce parasitaemia and enhance survival in experimental Trypanosoma cruzi infection, although the nature of these protective effects is(More)
Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) is an enzyme that has the capacity to release glycosyl-phosphatidyl inositol (G-PI)-anchored proteins from the cells surface. Pretreatment of the human T-cell leukemia cell line Molt-4 with PI-PLC resulted in a decrease in the susceptibility to lysis by natural killer (NK) cells. Treatment of the(More)
Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) treatment of the human natural killer (NK) target cells Molt-4, Jurkat, and U937 reduced their susceptibility to killing by human NK cells in a dose-dependent fashion. This indicates that a cell surface structure, anchored by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (G-PI) moiety, is important in NK(More)
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