Claire Vanpouille-Box

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The immune system has the ability to recognize and specifically reject tumors, and tumors only become clinically apparent once they have evaded immune destruction by creating an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Radiotherapy (RT) can cause immunogenic tumor cell death resulting in cross-priming of tumor-specific T-cells, acting as an in situ tumor(More)
T cells directed to endogenous tumor antigens are powerful mediators of tumor regression. Recent immunotherapy advances have identified effective interventions to unleash tumor-specific T-cell activity in patients who naturally develop them. Eliciting T-cell responses to a patient's individual tumor remains a major challenge. Radiation therapy can induce(More)
The ability of ionizing radiation to cause cell death and inflammatory reactions has been known since the beginning of its therapeutic use in oncology. However, only recently this property of radiation has attracted the attention of immunologists seeking to induce or improve antitumor immunity. As immune checkpoint inhibitors are becoming mainstream cancer(More)
Radiotherapy can convert malignant cells into an in situ anticancer vaccine, but is often inadequate at generating sufficient pro-inflammatory signals to optimally activate innate and adaptive immune responses. Topical imiquimod is a powerful pro-inflammatory agent with clinical activity against superficial skin cancers. These two modalities appear to(More)
T cells directed to endogenous tumor antigens are powerful mediators of tumor regression. Recent immunotherapy advances have identified effective interventions to unleash tumor-specific T-cell activity in patients who naturally develop them. Eliciting T-cell responses to a patient's individual tumor remains a major challenge. Radiation therapy can induce(More)
The main role of the immune system is to restore tissue homeostasis when altered by pathogenic processes, including neoplastic transformation. Immune-mediated tumor rejection has been recognized as an extrinsic tumor suppressor mechanism that tumors need to overcome to progress. By the time a tumor becomes clinically apparent it has successfully escaped(More)
PURPOSE This study tested the hypothesis that topical Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 agonist imiquimod promotes antitumor immunity and synergizes with other treatments in a model of skin-involving breast cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN TSA mouse breast carcinoma cells were injected s.c. into syngeneic mice. Imiquimod 5% or placebo cream was applied topically on(More)
Targeting immune checkpoint receptors has emerged as an effective strategy to induce immune-mediated cancer regression in the subset of patients who have significant pre-existing anti-tumor immunity. For the remainder, effective anti tumor responses may require vaccination. Radiotherapy, traditionally used to achieve local tumor control, has acquired a new(More)
Radiotherapy (RT) is employed to achieve local cancer control. However, in rare patients, regression of metastases outside of the radiation field has been reported after irradiation of one tumor site, a phenomenon known as abscopal effect. We have previously shown in experimental tumor models that the abscopal effect is mediated by activation of anti-tumor(More)
Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGFb) and activin A (actA) are members of the TGFb superfamily and display overlapping biological activities, including the ability to promote the conversion of conventional CD4 T cells to regulatory T cells (Tregs). We have recently shown that in situ vaccination by local tumor irradiation is hindered by activation of(More)