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Bodies capture attention when nothing is expected
Functional neuroimaging research has shown that certain classes of visual stimulus selectively activate focal regions of visual cortex. Specifically, cortical areas that generally and selectivelyExpand
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Transatlantic perspectives on variation in negative expressions
Negation with indefinite items in English can be expressed in three ways: any-negation (I didn’t have any money), no-negation (I had no money) and negative concord (I didn’t have no money). TheseExpand
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Integrating syntactic theory and variationist analysis : The structure of negative indefinites in regional dialects of British English
This paper integrates syntactic theory and variationist analysis in an investigation of the variation between English not-negation (I don’t have any money), no-negation (I have no money) and negativeExpand
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Variation and change in English negation : a cross-dialectal perspective
Although negation is a linguistic universal (Dahl 1979; Horn 2001: xiii), the ways in which it is expressed are highly variable within and across languages (Miestamo 2005; de Swart 2010: 245). ThisExpand
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Comparative Sociolinguistic Insights in the Evolution of Negation
There are three ways of expressing negation on indefinites in English: any-negation (I didn’t have any money), no-negation (I had no money) and negative concord (I didn’t have no money). TheseExpand
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Interviewer effects on the phonetic reduction of negative tags, innit?
Abstract This paper investigates interviewer effects on speakers' use of full, reduced or coalesced variants of negative tags, e.g. it's a nice day, isn't it/int it/innit? Using a corpus of NorthExpand
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"I couldn't really put [mə] finger on it" : Phonetic realisations of the possessive singular 'my' in Tyneside English
The phonetic realisation of the first-person singular possessive form my is highly variable, as observed by Hollmann and Siewierska (2007) in their account of the feature in Lancashire and SnellExpand
Canny good, or quite canny?
TLDR
The word canny has long been associated with the dialects of the North East of England, most typically in its adjectival sense. Expand
Review of Bamford, J., Cavalieri, S. and Diani, G. (Eds). (2013) Variation and Change in Spoken and Written Discourse: Perspectives from Corpus Linguistics. Amsterdam: John Benjamins
Bamford et al. (2013) edited volume comprises 16 studies of language variation and change in speech and writing, spanning both corpus-driven and corpus-based approaches. Although some of the studiesExpand
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