Chrystelle Colas

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BACKGROUND Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is a well-described inherited syndrome, which is responsible for <1% of all colorectal cancer (CRC) cases. The syndrome is characterised by the development of hundreds to thousands of adenomas in the colorectum. Almost all patients will develop CRC if they are not identified and treated at an early stage. The(More)
CONTEXT Providing accurate estimates of cancer risks is a major challenge in the clinical management of Lynch syndrome. OBJECTIVE To estimate the age-specific cumulative risks of developing various tumors using a large series of families with mutations of the MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 genes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Families with Lynch syndrome(More)
Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS, MIM175200) is an autosomal dominant condition defined by the development of characteristic polyps throughout the gastrointestinal tract and mucocutaneous pigmentation. The majority of patients that meet the clinical diagnostic criteria have a causative mutation in the STK11 gene, which is located at 19p13.3. The cancer risks in(More)
Lynch syndrome (LS) is characterised by the development of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and various other cancers, and is caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. In 2007, a group of European experts (the Mallorca group) published guidelines for the clinical management of LS. Since then substantial new(More)
Familial colorectal cancer (CRC) accounts for 10–15% of all CRCs. In about 5% of all cases, CRC is associated with a highly penetrant dominant inherited syndrome. The most common inherited form of non-polyposis CRC is the Lynch syndrome which is responsible for about 2–4% of all cases. Surveillance of individuals at high risk for CRC prevents the(More)
Several genes might explain BRCA1/2 negative breast and ovarian family cases. Deleterious mutations in few genes involved in the Fanconi complex are responsible for Fanconi anemia at the homozygous state and breast cancer (BC) susceptibility at the heterozygous state (BRCA2, PALB2, BRIP1). RAD51C plays an important role in the double-strand break repair(More)
Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD) syndrome is a distinct childhood cancer predisposition syndrome that results from biallelic germline mutations in one of the four MMR genes, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. The tumour spectrum is very broad, including mainly haematological, brain and intestinal tract tumours. Patients show a variety of(More)
INTRODUCTION CDH1 predisposes primarily to diffuse gastric cancer (DGC). Multiple DGC cases in a family, DGC at a young age in an individual or the combination of DGC andlobular breast cancer (LBC) in an individual or a family define the hereditary DGC syndrome (HDGC), and testing for germline CDH1 mutations is warranted in HDGC. METHODS AND RESULTS We(More)
The MUTYH gene encodes a DNA glycosylase involved in base excision repair (BER). Biallelic pathogenic MUTYH variants have been associated with colorectal polyposis and cancer. The pathogenicity of a few variants is beyond doubt, including c.536A4G/p.Tyr179Cys and c.1187G4A/p.Gly396Asp (previously c.494A4G/p.Tyr165Cys and c.1145G4A/p.Gly382Asp).However, for(More)
Lynch syndrome (LS) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by a defect in one of the DNA mismatch repair genes: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. In the last 15 years, an increasing number of patients have been described with biallelic mismatch repair gene mutations causing a syndrome referred to as 'constitutional mismatch repair-deficiency' (CMMR-D). The(More)