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Programmed cell death (apoptosis) occurs during normal development of the central nervous system. However, the mechanisms that determine which neurons will succumb to apoptosis are poorly understood. Blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors for only a few hours during late fetal or early neonatal life triggered widespread apoptotic(More)
Structural damage of the human brain (perinatal damage, cerebral trauma, head injury, cerebrovascular and degenerative diseases, intracranial tumor, metabolic diseases, toxins, drug-induced seizures) may lead to chronic epilepsy in survivors. Epidemiologic analyses show that a considerable time-delay occurs between the exposure of the brain to injury and(More)
Intrinsic antioxidant defenses are important for neuronal longevity. We found that in rat neurons, synaptic activity, acting via NMDA receptor (NMDAR) signaling, boosted antioxidant defenses by making changes to the thioredoxin-peroxiredoxin (Prx) system. Synaptic activity enhanced thioredoxin activity, facilitated the reduction of overoxidized Prxs and(More)
High-dose treatment with pilocarpine hydrochloride, a cholinergic muscarinic agonist, induces seizures in rodents following systemic or intracerebral administration. Pilocarpine seizures are characterized by a sequential development of behavioral patterns and electrographic activity. Hypoactivity, tremor, scratching, head bobbing, and myoclonic movements of(More)
Glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists (competitive receptor antagonists, ion channel blockers, and glycine antagonists)--such as selfotel, aptiganel, eliprodil, licostinel and gavestinel--failed to show efficacy in clinical trials of stroke or traumatic brain injury. This failure has been attributed to the deficient properties of the(More)
Age dependency of apoptotic neurodegeneration was studied in the developing rat brain after percussion head trauma. In 7-day-old rats, mechanical trauma, applied by means of a weight drop device, was shown to trigger widespread cell death in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the trauma site, which first appeared at 6 hours, peaked at 24 hours, and subsided by 5(More)
The developing rodent brain is vulnerable to pharmacological blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors which can lead to severe and disseminated apoptotic neurodegeneration. Here, we show that systemic administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 to 7-day-old rats leads to impaired activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2(More)
Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder of young humans. Each year 150,000 children in the United States experience their first seizure. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), used to treat seizures in children, infants, and pregnant women, cause cognitive impairment, microcephaly, and birth defects. The cause of unwanted effects of therapy with AEDs is(More)
Epilepsy is the most common neurologic disorder in young humans. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), used to treat seizures in children, infants, and pregnant women, cause cognitive impairment, microcephaly, and birth defects by unknown mechanisms. We tested whether common AEDs cause neurodegeneration in the developing rat brain. Rats aged 3-30 days received(More)
Apoptosis is a word originally introduced by Kerr, Wyllie, and colleagues for a cell death process they defined in terms of its ultrastructural appearance in nonneuronal cells from various tissues. There are very few studies providing detailed ultrastructural criteria for recognizing neuronal apoptosis in the in vivo mammalian brain. In the absence of such(More)