Christy Chuang-Stein

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A PhRMA Working Group on adaptive clinical trial designs has been formed to investigate and facilitate opportunities for wider acceptance and usage of adaptive designs and related methodologies. A White Paper summarizing the findings of the group is in preparation; this article is an Executive Summary for that full White Paper, and summarizes the findings(More)
Attrition is a ubiquitous problem in randomized controlled clinical trials (RCT) of psychotropic agents that can cause biased estimates of the treatment effect, reduce statistical power, and restrict the generalizability of results. The extent of the problem of attrition in central nervous system (CNS) trials is considered here and its consequences are(More)
We propose a family of log-linear models for ordinal data that contain parameters reflecting change patterns to compare treatments relative to change from baseline. Under the most general model, rates of change can depend not only upon the direction of change, but also upon the level of the baseline classification. We describe methods for selection of a(More)
It is frequently noted that an initial clinical trial finding was not reproduced in a later trial. This is often met with some surprise. Yet, there is a relatively straightforward reason partially responsible for this observation. In this article, we examine this reason by first reviewing some findings in a recent publication in the Journal of the American(More)
In March 2011, a Final Rule for expedited reporting of serious adverse events took effect in the United States for studies conducted under an Investigational New Drug (IND) application. In December 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) promulgated a final Guidance describing the operationalization of this Final Rule. The Rule and Guidance(More)
BACKGROUND Accurately monitoring and collecting drug adherence data can allow for better understanding and interpretation of the outcomes of clinical trials. Most clinical trials use a combination of pill counts and self-reported data to measure drug adherence, despite the drawbacks of relying on these types of indirect measures. It is assumed that doses(More)
The minimum clinically important difference (MCID) between treatments is recognized as a key concept in the design and interpretation of results from a clinical trial. Yet even assuming such a difference can be derived, it is not necessarily clear how it should be used. In this paper, we consider three possible roles for the MCID. They are: (1) using the(More)
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