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In a system where noncooperative agents share a common resource, we propose the price of anarchy, which is the ratio between the worst possible Nash equilibrium and the social optimum, as a measure of the effectiveness of the system. Deriving upper and lower bounds for this ratio in a model where several agents share a very simple network leads to some(More)
Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a laboratory method to measure gains and losses in the copy number of chromosomal regions in tumor cells. It is hypothesized that certain DNA gains and losses are related to cancer progression and that the patterns of these changes are relevant to the clinical consequences of the cancer. It is therefore of interest(More)
We resolve the question of the complexity of Nash equilibrium by showing that the problem of computing a Nash equilibrium in a game with 4 or more players is complete for the complexity class PPAD. Our proof uses ideas from the recently-established equivalence between polynomial time solvability of normal form games and graphical games, establishing that(More)
Comparative genome hybridization (CGH) is a laboratory method to measure gains and losses of chromosomal regions in tumor cells. It is believed that DNA gains and losses in tumor cells do not occur entirely at random, but partly through some flow of causality. Models that relate tumor progression to the occurrence of DNA gains and losses could be very(More)
We define a natural variant of NP, MAX NP, and also a subclass called MAX SNP. These are classes of optimization problems, and in fact contain several natural, well-studied ones. We show that problems in these classes can be approximated with some bounded error. Furthermore, we show that a number of common optimization problems are complete for MAXSNP under(More)
We define several new complexity classes of search problems, "between" the classes FP and FNP. These new classes are contained, along with factoring, and the class PLS, in the class TFNP of search problems in FNP that always have a witness. A problem in each of these new classes is defined in terms of an implicitly given, exponentially large graph. The(More)
In the Multiterminal Cut problem we are given an edge-weighted graph and a subset of the vertices called terminals, and asked for a minimum weight set of edges that separates each terminal from all the others. When the number k of terminals is two, this is simply the min-cut, max-flow problem, and can be solved in polynomial time. We show that the problem(More)