Christos Doumas

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Although mature technologies exist for acquiring images, geometry, and normals of small objects, they remain cumbersome and time-consuming for non-experts to employ on a large scale. In an archaeological setting, a practical acquisition system for routine use on <i>every</i> artifact and fragment would open new possibilities for archiving, analysis, and(More)
Permission to publish this Abstract separately is granted. ABSTRACT In this paper a novel general methodology is introduced for the computer-aided reconstruction of the magnificent wall-paintings of the Greek island Thera (Santorini), painted in the middle of the second millennium BC. These wall-paintings are excavated in fragments and, as a result, their(More)
Several studies have revealed an increased incidence of thyroid cancer in volcanic areas around the world. Hawaii and the Philippines on the rim of the Pacific Ocean, where the greatest number of volcanoes are located at convergent plate boundaries, are among the regions with the highest incidence of thyroid carcinoma worldwide. Iceland is another region(More)
In this paper, we analyze the fracture patterns observed in wall paintings excavated from Akrotiri, a Bronze-age Aegean city destroyed by earthquakes preceding a volcanic eruption on Thera (modern Santorini) around 1630 BC. We use interactive programs to trace detailed fragment boundaries in images of manually reconstructed wall paintings. Then, we use(More)
In this paper, an original general methodology is introduced to establish whether a handmade shape corresponds to a given geometrical prototype. Using this methodology, one can decide if an artist had the intention of drawing a specific mathematical prototype or not. This analysis is applied to the 1650 B.C. wall paintings from the prehistoric settlement on(More)
In this article, we analyze the fracture patterns observed in wall paintings excavated at Akrotiri, a Bronze Age Aegean settlement destroyed by a volcano on the Greek island of Thera around 1630 BC. We use interactive programs to trace detailed fragment boundaries in images of manually reconstructed wall paintings. Then, we use geometric analysis algorithms(More)
Attributing a season and a date to the volcanic eruption of Santorini in the Aegean has become possible by using preserved remains of the bean weevil, Bruchus rufipes, pests of pulses, from the storage jars of the West House, in the Bronze Age settlement at Akrotiri. We have applied an improved pre-treatment methodology for dating the charred insects, and(More)
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