Christos C. Ioannou

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The spontaneous emergence of pattern formation is ubiquitous in nature, often arising as a collective phenomenon from interactions among a large number of individual constituents or sub-systems. Understanding, and controlling, collective behavior is dependent on determining the low-level dynamical principles from which spatial and temporal patterns emerge;(More)
Determining individual-level interactions that govern highly coordinated motion in animal groups or cellular aggregates has been a long-standing challenge, central to understanding the mechanisms and evolution of collective behavior. Numerous models have been proposed, many of which display realistic-looking dynamics, but nonetheless rely on untested(More)
The capacity for groups to exhibit collective intelligence is an often-cited advantage of group living. Previous studies have shown that social organisms frequently benefit from pooling imperfect individual estimates. However, in principle, collective intelligence may also emerge from interactions between individuals, rather than from the enhancement of(More)
In groups of animals only a small proportion of individuals may possess particular information, such as a migration route or the direction to a resource. Individuals may differ in preferred direction resulting in conflicts of interest and, therefore, consensus decisions may have to be made to prevent the group from splitting. Recent theoretical work has(More)
Social transmission of information is vital for many group-living animals, allowing coordination of motion and effective response to complex environments. Revealing the interaction networks underlying information flow within these groups is a central challenge. Previous work has modeled interactions between individuals based directly on their relative(More)
A widespread example of coevolution between behaviour and morphology is that crypsis is associated with motionlessness. Surprisingly, however, the adaptive function of this association has never been investigated experimentally. We tested whether the risk of being detected by a predator is affected by crypsis, movement or an interaction between these two(More)
Sexual segregation is widespread throughout the animal kingdom. Although a number of hypotheses have been proposed to account for observed patterns, the generality of the mechanisms remains debated. One possible reason for this is the focus on segregation patterns in large mammals such as ungulates, where the majority of studies are descriptions of a single(More)
Cannibalism has been shown to be important to the collective motion of mass migratory bands of insects, such as locusts and Mormon crickets. These mobile groups consist of millions of individuals and are highly destructive to vegetation. Individuals move in response to attacks from approaching conspecifics and bite those ahead, resulting in further movement(More)
In contrast to the numerous studies that have examined the response of predators to prey group size, little is known about how prey density affects prey detection and the accuracy of attacks. We demonstrate that increasing the density of Daphnia magna swarms increases conspicuousness to a natural predator, the three-spined stickleback. Denser areas of(More)
Previous work has suggested that larger groups of prey are more conspicuous to predators. However, this ignores that prey populations are finite. As groups get larger they become fewer, hence the encounter rate between predator and prey decreases with prey aggregation. Here, we present a two-dimensional model based on visual angle to unify these encounter(More)