Christopher W. Clark

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Beaked whales have mass stranded during some naval sonar exercises, but the cause is unknown. They are difficult to sight but can reliably be detected by listening for echolocation clicks produced during deep foraging dives. Listening for these clicks, we documented Blainville's beaked whales, Mesoplodon densirostris, in a naval underwater range where(More)
With the overexploitation of many conventional fish stcocks, and growing interest in harvesting new kinds of food from the sea, there is increasing need for managers of fisheries to take account of interactions among species. In particular, as Antarctic krill-fishing industries grow, there is a need to agree upon sound principles for managing the Southern(More)
Acoustic masking from anthropogenic noise is increasingly being considered as a threat to marine mammals, particularly low-frequency specialists such as baleen whales. Low-frequency ocean noise has increased in recent decades, often in habitats with seasonally resident populations of marine mammals, raising concerns that noise chronically influences life(More)
Acute effects of anthropogenic sounds on marine mammals, such as from military sonars, energy development, and offshore construction, have received considerable international attention from scientists, regulators, and industry. Moreover, there has been increasing recognition and concern about the potential chronic effects of human activities (e.g.,(More)
The impact of anthropogenic noise on marine mammals has been an area of increasing concern over the past two decades. Most low-frequency anthropogenic noise in the ocean comes from commercial shipping which has contributed to an increase in ocean background noise over the past 150 years. The long-term impacts of these changes on marine mammals are not well(More)
Singing by males is a major feature of the mating system of humpback whales, Megaptera novaeangliae (Borowski). Although a few songs have been opportunistically recorded on the whales' high-latitude feeding grounds, singing in these regions was thought to be only sporadic. We report results from the first continuous acoustic monitoring of a humpback whale(More)
The low-frequency vocalizations of fin and blue whales are the most powerful and ubiquitous biological sounds in the ocean. Here we combine acoustic localization and molecular techniques to show that, in fin whales, only males produce these vocalizations. This finding indicates that they may function as male breeding displays, and will help to focus concern(More)
Interspecific competition is usually thought of in terms of resource competition. Closely related species, however, may often compete also for a "sexual niche," a sexual resource. Both sexual and resource competition are likely to affect the dynamics of closely related sympatric species. Here, a combined model of sexual and resource competition is developed(More)