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The low-frequency vocalizations of fin and blue whales are the most powerful and ubiquitous biological sounds in the ocean. Here we combine acoustic localization and molecular techniques to show that, in fin whales, only males produce these vocalizations. This finding indicates that they may function as male breeding displays, and will help to focus concern(More)
INTRODUCTION The concept of acoustic interference is familiar to anyone who has tried to have a conversation in a noisy restaurant or to listen for the ring of a phone in another room through the acoustic clutter from a nearby television. In such situations the collective noise from many sources or the clutter of voices coming from a single location may(More)
A method is described for the automatic recognition of transient animal sounds. Automatic recognition can be used in wild animal research, including studies of behavior, population, and impact of anthropogenic noise. The method described here, spectrogram correlation, is well-suited to recognition of animal sounds consisting of tones and frequency sweeps.(More)
Beaked whales have mass stranded during some naval sonar exercises, but the cause is unknown. They are difficult to sight but can reliably be detected by listening for echolocation clicks produced during deep foraging dives. Listening for these clicks, we documented Blainville's beaked whales, Mesoplodon densirostris, in a naval underwater range where(More)
The impact of anthropogenic noise on marine mammals has been an area of increasing concern over the past two decades. Most low-frequency anthropogenic noise in the ocean comes from commercial shipping which has contributed to an increase in ocean background noise over the past 150 years. The long-term impacts of these changes on marine mammals are not well(More)
With the overexploitation of many conventional fish stcocks, and growing interest in harvesting new kinds of food from the sea, there is increasing need for managers of fisheries to take account of interactions among species. In particular, as Antarctic krill-fishing industries grow, there is a need to agree upon sound principles for managing the Southern(More)
The recent loss of Arctic sea ice provides humans unprecedented access to the region. Marine mammals rely on sound as a primary sensory modality, and the noise associated with increasing human activities offshore can interfere with vital life functions. Many coastal communities rely on marine mammals for food and cultural identity, and subsistence hunters(More)
In 2006, we used the U.S. Coast Guard's Automatic Identification System (AIS) to describe patterns of large commercial ship traffic within a U.S. National Marine Sanctuary located off the coast of Massachusetts. We found that 541 large commercial vessels transited the greater sanctuary 3413 times during the year. Cargo ships, tankers, and tug/tows(More)
The effects of chronic exposure to increasing levels of human-induced underwater noise on marine animal populations reliant on sound for communication are poorly understood. We sought to further develop methods of quantifying the effects of communication masking associated with human-induced sound on contact-calling North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena(More)