Christopher Morrell

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Readers of programs have two main sources of domain information: identifier names and comments. When functions are uncommented, as many are, comprehension is almost exclusively dependent on the identifier names. Assuming that writers of programs want to create quality identi-fiers (e.g., include relevant domain knowledge) how should they go about it? For(More)
Naming conventions are generally adopted in an effort to improve program comprehension. Two of the most popular conventions are alternatives for composing multi-word identifiers: the use of underscores and the use of camel casing. While most programmers have a personal opinion as to which style is better, empirical study forms a more appropriate basis for(More)
Readers of programs have two main sources of domain information: identifier names and comments. When functions are uncommented, as many are, comprehension is almost exclusively dependent on the identifier names. Assuming that writers of programs want to create quality identifiers (e.g., identifiers that include relevant domain knowledge) how should they go(More)
Unlabeled network traffic data is readily available to the security research community, but there is a severe shortage of labeled datasets that allow validation of experimental results. The labeled DARPA datasets of 1998 and 1999, while innovative at the time, are of only marginal utility in today's threat environment. In this paper we demonstrate that(More)
Because early variable mnemonics were limited to as few as six to eight characters, many early programmers abbreviated concepts in their variable names. The past thirty years have seen a steady increase in permitted name length and, slowly, an increase in the actual identifier length. However, in theory names can be too long for programmers to comprehend(More)
Routing protocols for wireless sensor networks face two challenges. One is an efficient bandwidth usage which requires minimum delay between transfers of packets. Establishing permanent routes from the source to destination addresses this challenge since the received packet can be immediately transmitted to the next node. However, any disruption on the(More)
Routing protocols for Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) face three major performance challenges. The first one is an efficient use of bandwidth that minimizes the transfer delay of packets between nodes to ensure the shortest end-to-end delay for packet transmission from source to destination. The second challenge is the ability to maintain data flow around(More)
This paper presents a biologically inspired routing protocol called Self Selective Routing with preferred path selection (SSR(v3)). Its operation resembles the behavior of a biological ant that finds a food source by following the strongest pheromone scent left by scout ants at each fork of a path. Likewise, at each hop of a multi-hop path, a packet using(More)