Christopher Morrell

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Information Retrieval (IR) based tools complement traditional static and dynamic analysis tools by exploiting the natural language found within a program's text. Tools incorporating IR have tackled problems, such as feature location, that previously required considerable human effort. However, to reap the full benefit of IR-based techniques, the language(More)
Readers of programs have two main sources of domain information: identifier names and comments. When functions are uncommented, as many are, comprehension is almost exclusively dependent on the identifier names. Assuming that writers of programs want to create quality identifiers (e.g., include relevant domain knowledge) how should they go about it? For(More)
Unlabeled network traffic data is readily available to the security research community, but there is a severe shortage of labeled datasets that allow validation of experimental results. The labeled DARPA datasets of 1998 and 1999, while innovative at the time, are of only marginal utility in today’s threat environment. In this paper we demonstrate that(More)
Readers of programs have two main sources of domain information: identifier names and comments. When functions are uncommented, as many are, comprehension is almost exclusively dependent on the identifier names. Assuming that writers of programs want to create quality identifiers (e.g., identifiers that include relevant domain knowledge), one must ask how(More)
Naming conventions are generally adopted in an effort to improve program comprehension. Two of the most popular conventions are alternatives for composing multi-word identifiers: the use of underscores and the use of camel casing. While most programmers have a personal opinion as to which style is better, empirical study forms a more appropriate basis for(More)
Information security and privacy on the internet are critical issues in our society. In this research, we examine factors that influence Internet users' private-information-sharing behavior. Based on a survey of 285 preteens and early teens, who are among the most vulnerable groups on the Web, this study provides a research framework that explains an(More)
Routing protocols for wireless sensor networks face two challenges. One is an efficient bandwidth usage which requires minimum delay between transfers of packets. Establishing permanent routes from the source to destination addresses this challenge since the received packet can be immediately transmitted to the next node. However, any disruption on the(More)
Moving target defense is an area of network security research in which machines are moved logically around a network in order to avoid detection. This is done by leveraging the immense size of the IPv6 address space and the statistical improbability of two machines selecting the same IPv6 address. This defensive technique forces a malicious actor to focus(More)
This paper presents a biologically inspired routing protocol called Self Selective Routing with preferred path selection (SSR(v3)). Its operation resembles the behavior of a biological ant that finds a food source by following the strongest pheromone scent left by scout ants at each fork of a path. Likewise, at each hop of a multi-hop path, a packet using(More)
New approaches to Quality-of-Service (QoS) Routing in wireless sensor networks which use different forms of learning are the subject of this paper. The Cognitive Packet Network (CPN) algorithm uses smart packets for path discovery, together with reinforcement learning and neural networks, while SelfSelective Routing (SSR) is based on the “Ant Colony”(More)