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There is growing recognition of the important roles played by predators in regulating ecosystems and sustaining biodiversity. Much attention has focused on the consequences of predator-regulation of herbivore populations, and associated trophic cascades. However apex predators may also control smaller 'mesopredators' through intraguild interactions. Removal(More)
Measuring trends in the size of prehistoric populations is fundamental to our understanding of the demography of ancient people and their responses to environmental change. Archaeologists commonly use the temporal distribution of radiocarbon dates to reconstruct population trends, but this can give a false picture of population growth because of the loss of(More)
BACKGROUND Life-threatening disorders of heart rhythm may arise during infancy and can result in the sudden and tragic death of a child. We performed exome sequencing on 2 unrelated infants presenting with recurrent cardiac arrest to discover a genetic cause. METHODS AND RESULTS We ascertained 2 unrelated infants (probands) with recurrent cardiac arrest(More)
The hypothalamic peptides orexin-A and orexin-B are potent agonists of two G-protein coupled receptors, namely the OX(1) and the OX(2) receptor. These receptors are widely distributed, though differentially, in the rat brain. In particular, the OX(1) receptor is highly expressed throughout the hypothalamus, whilst the OX(2) receptor is mainly located in the(More)
Giant vertebrates dominated many Pleistocene ecosystems. Many were herbivores, and their sudden extinction in prehistory could have had large ecological impacts. We used a high-resolution 130,000-year environmental record to help resolve the cause and reconstruct the ecological consequences of extinction of Australia's megafauna. Our results suggest that(More)
Tropical savannas cover 20-30% of the world's land surface and exhibit high levels of regional endemism, but the evolutionary histories of their biota remain poorly studied. The most extensive and unmodified tropical savannas occur in Northern Australia, and recent studies suggest this region supports high levels of previously undetected genetic diversity.(More)
Top predators in terrestrial ecosystems may limit populations of smaller predators that could otherwise become over abundant and cause declines and extinctions of some prey. It is therefore possible that top predators indirectly protect many species of prey from excessive predation. This effect has been demonstrated in some small-scale studies, but it is(More)
At their clinical doses, current antipsychotic agents share the property of both dopamine D(2) and D(3) receptor blockade. However, a major disadvantage of many current medications are the observed extrapyramidal side-effects (EPS), postulated to arise from D(2) receptor antagonism. Consequently, a selective dopamine D(3) receptor antagonist could offer an(More)
BACKGROUND The rising global temperature is predicted to expand the distribution of vector-borne diseases both in latitude and altitude. Many host communities could be affected by increased prevalence of disease, heightening the risk of extinction for many already threatened species. To understand how host communities could be affected by changing parasite(More)
Current applications of species distribution models (SDM) are typically static, in that they are based on correlations between where a species has been observed (ignoring the date of the observation) and environmental features, such as long-term climate means, that are assumed to be constant for each site. Because of this SDMs do not account for temporal(More)