Christopher D. Walton

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This paper introduces the multiagent protocols (MAP) Web service choreography language and demonstrates how service choreographies can be specified, verified, and enacted with a comparatively simple process language. MAP is a directly executable specification, services do not have to be preconfigured at design-time. Instead, a choreography, specified in(More)
In this paper we address the challenges associated with the verification of correctness of communication between agents in MultiAgent Systems. Our approach applies model-checking techniques to protocols which express interactions between a group of agents in the form of a dialogue. We define a lightweight protocol language which can express a wide range of(More)
In this paper we propose a new agent communication language which separates agent dialogue from any specific agent reasoning technology. This language is intended to address a number of perceived shortcomings with the mentalistic model of agent communication on which the FIPA-ACL standard is founded. Our language expresses inter-agent dialogue through the(More)
In this paper, we introduce the Multi-Agent Protocol (MAP) language which expresses dialogues in Multi-Agent Systems. MAP defines precisely the pattern of message exchange that occurs between the agents, though it is independent of the actual rational processes and message-content. This approach makes MAP applicable to a wide range of different agent(More)
In this paper we address the verification of communication between agents participating in multi-agent web service systems. Our approach is founded on the application of modelchecking techniques to protocols which express interactions between a group of agents in the form of a dialogue. We outline a web service architecture which supports the construction(More)
In this paper we present a technique which addresses the composition of web services into peer-to-peer systems. Our approach is founded on the definition of lightweight protocols, which provide the means to specify, execute, and verify these systems. The advantage of our approach is that the protocols are defined independent of the domain in question, and(More)