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The stability of the Wnt pathway transcription factor beta-catenin is tightly regulated by the multi-subunit destruction complex. Deregulated Wnt pathway activity has been implicated in many cancers, making this pathway an attractive target for anticancer therapies. However, the development of targeted Wnt pathway inhibitors has been hampered by the limited(More)
Genetic instability was one of the first characteristics to be postulated to underlie neoplasia. Such genetic instability occurs in two different forms. In a small fraction of colorectal and some other cancers, defective repair of mismatched bases results in an increased mutation rate at the nucleotide level and consequent widespread microsatellite(More)
Inactivation of tumour suppressor genes is central to the development of all common forms of human cancer. This inactivation often results from epigenetic silencing associated with hypermethylation rather than intragenic mutations. In human cells, the mechanisms underlying locus-specific or global methylation patterns remain unclear. The prototypic DNA(More)
Genes of the RAF family encode kinases that are regulated by Ras and mediate cellular responses to growth signals. Activating mutations in one RAF gene, BRAF, have been found in a high proportion of melanomas and in a small fraction of other cancers. Here we show that BRAF mutations in colorectal cancers occur only in tumours that do not carry mutations in(More)
After DNA damage, many cells appear to enter a sustained arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. It is shown here that this arrest could be sustained only when p53 was present in the cell and capable of transcriptionally activating the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. After disruption of either the p53 or the p21 gene, gamma radiated cells(More)
Protein kinases are enzymes that are important for controlling cellular growth and invasion, and their malfunction is implicated in the development of some tumours. We analysed human colorectal cancers for genetic mutations in 340 serine/threonine kinases and found mutations in eight genes, including in three members of the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase(More)
Hypermethylation is associated with the silencing of tumour susceptibility genes in several forms of cancer; however, the mechanisms responsible for this aberrant methylation are poorly understood. The prototypic DNA methyltransferase, DNMT1, has been widely assumed to be responsible for most of the methylation of the human genome, including the abnormal(More)
Although most colorectal cancers are chromosomally unstable, the basis for this instability has not been defined. To determine whether genes shown to cause chromosomal instability in model systems were mutated in colorectal cancers, we identified their human homologues and determined their sequence in a panel of colorectal cancers. We found 19 somatic(More)