Christine Vogel

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We report a method for large-scale absolute protein expression measurements (APEX) and apply it to estimate the relative contributions of transcriptional- and translational-level gene regulation in the yeast and Escherichia coli proteomes. APEX relies upon correcting each protein's mass spectrometry sampling depth (observed peptide count) by learned(More)
The SUPERFAMILY database provides structural assignments to protein sequences and a framework for analysis of the results. At the core of the database is a library of profile Hidden Markov Models that represent all proteins of known structure. The library is based on the SCOP classification of proteins: each model corresponds to a SCOP domain and aims to(More)
SUPERFAMILY provides structural, functional and evolutionary information for proteins from all completely sequenced genomes, and large sequence collections such as UniProt. Protein domain assignments for over 900 genomes are included in the database, which can be accessed at http://supfam.org/. Hidden Markov models based on Structural Classification of(More)
Recent advances in next-generation DNA sequencing and proteomics provide an unprecedented ability to survey mRNA and protein abundances. Such proteome-wide surveys are illuminating the extent to which different aspects of gene expression help to regulate cellular protein abundances. Current data demonstrate a substantial role for regulatory processes(More)
The SUPERFAMILY database provides protein domain assignments, at the SCOP 'superfamily' level, for the predicted protein sequences in over 400 completed genomes. A superfamily groups together domains of different families which have a common evolutionary ancestor based on structural, functional and sequence data. SUPERFAMILY domain assignments are generated(More)
Cellular states are determined by differential expression of the cell's proteins. The relationship between protein and mRNA expression levels informs about the combined outcomes of translation and protein degradation which are, in addition to transcription and mRNA stability, essential contributors to gene expression regulation. This review summarizes the(More)
During the course of evolution, new proteins are produced very largely as the result of gene duplication, divergence and, in many cases, combination. This means that proteins or protein domains belong to families or, in cases where their relationships can only be recognised on the basis of structure, superfamilies whose members descended from a common(More)
Transcription, mRNA decay, translation and protein degradation are essential processes during eukaryotic gene expression, but their relative global contributions to steady-state protein concentrations in multi-cellular eukaryotes are largely unknown. Using measurements of absolute protein and mRNA abundances in cellular lysate from the human Daoy(More)
Proteins are composed of evolutionary units called domains; the majority of proteins consist of at least two domains. These domains and nature of their interactions determine the function of the protein. The roles that combinations of domains play in the formation of the protein repertoire have been found by analysis of domain assignments to genome(More)