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  • Philip B. Brewer, Elizabeth A. Dun, Brett James Ferguson, Catherine Rameau, Christine A Beveridge
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Plant Physiology
  • 2009 (First Publication: 25 March 2009)
  • During the last century, two key hypotheses have been proposed to explain apical dominance in plants: auxin promotes the production of a second messenger that moves up into buds to repress theirExpand
  • Xenie Johnson, Tanya Brcich, +4 authors Catherine Rameau
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Plant Physiology
  • 2006 (First Publication: 15 September 2006)
  • Physiological and genetic studies with the ramosus (rms) mutants in garden pea (Pisum sativum) and more axillary shoots (max) mutants in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) have shown that shootExpand
  • Mark T. Waters, Philip B. Brewer, John Desmond Bussell, Steven M Smith, Christine A Beveridge
  • Medicine, Engineering, Biology
  • Plant Physiology
  • 2012 (First Publication: 22 May 2012)
  • Strigolactones (SLs) are carotenoid-derived plant hormones that regulate shoot branching, secondary growth, root development, and responses to soil phosphate. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana),Expand
  • Michael Glenn Mason, John J Ross, Benjamin A Babst, Brittany N Wienclaw, Christine A Beveridge
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
  • 2014 (First Publication: 7 April 2014)
  • Significance It is commonly accepted that the plant hormone auxin mediates apical dominance. However, we have discovered that apical dominance strongly correlates with sugar availability and notExpand
  • Eloise Foo, Erika Bullier, Magali Goussot, Fabrice Foucher, Catherine Rameau, Christine A Beveridge
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The Plant Cell Online
  • 2005 (First Publication: 1 February 2005)
  • In Pisum sativum, the RAMOSUS genes RMS1, RMS2, and RMS5 regulate shoot branching via physiologically defined mobile signals. RMS1 is most likely a carotenoid cleavage enzyme and acts with RMS5 toExpand