Christina Benda

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Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been generated with varied efficiencies from multiple tissues. Yet, acquiring donor cells is, in most instances, an invasive procedure that requires laborious isolation. Here we present a detailed protocol for generating human iPSCs from exfoliated renal epithelial cells present in urine. This method is(More)
Forced expression of selected transcription factors can transform somatic cells into embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like cells, termed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). There is no consensus regarding the preferred tissue from which to harvest donor cells for reprogramming into iPSCs, and some donor cell types may be more prone than others to accumulation(More)
The generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells by exogenous transcription factors involves a comprehensive rearrangement of cellular functions, including the microRNA profile. The resulting cell lines are similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells and have therefore raised much interest for in vitro studies and the perspective of clinical application.(More)
Oct4 is a transcription factor that plays a major role for the preservation of the pluripotent state in embryonic stem cells as well as for efficient reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) or other progenitors. Protein-based reprogramming methods mainly rely on the addition of a fused cell penetrating peptide. This study(More)
Reactivation of the pluripotency network during somatic cell reprogramming by exogenous transcription factors involves chromatin remodeling and the recruitment of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to target loci. Here, we report that Pol II is engaged at pluripotency promoters in reprogramming but remains paused and inefficiently released. We also show that(More)