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Epilepsy affects more than 0.5% of the world's population and has a large genetic component. It is due to an electrical hyperexcitability in the central nervous system. Potassium channels are important regulators of electrical signalling, and benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNC), an autosomal dominant epilepsy of infancy, is caused by mutations in(More)
KCNQ2 and KCNQ3, both of which are mutated in a type of human neonatal epilepsy, form heteromeric potassium channels that are expressed in broad regions of the brain. The associated current may be identical to the M-current, an important regulator of neuronal excitability. We now show that the RNA encoding the novel KCNQ5 channel is also expressed in brain(More)
Benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNC) is an autosomal dominant epilepsy of infancy, with loci mapped to human chromosomes 20q13.3 and 8q24. By positional cloning, a potassium channel gene (KCNQ2) located on 20q13.3 was isolated and found to be expressed in brain. Expression of KCNQ2 in frog (Xenopus laevis) oocytes led to potassium-selective currents(More)
Potassium channels regulate electrical signaling and the ionic composition of biological fluids. Mutations in the three known genes of the KCNQ branch of the K+ channel gene family underlie inherited cardiac arrhythmias (in some cases associated with deafness) and neonatal epilepsy. We have now cloned KCNQ4, a novel member of this branch. It maps to the(More)
Neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson and Alzheimer disease cause motor and cognitive dysfunction and belong to a heterogeneous group of common and disabling disorders. Although the complex molecular pathophysiology of neurodegeneration is largely unknown, major advances have been achieved by elucidating the genetic defects underlying mendelian(More)
The inherited long QT syndrome (LQTS), characterized by a prolonged QT interval in the electrocardiogram and cardiac arrhythmia, is caused by mutations in at least four different genes, three of which have been identified and encode cardiac ion channels. The most common form of LQTS is due to mutations in the potassium channel gene KVLQT1, but their effects(More)
Mutations in the ClC-1 muscle chloride channel cause either recessive or dominant myotonia congenita. Using a systematic screening procedure, we have now identified four novel missense mutations in dominant (V286A, F307S) and recessive myotonia (V236L, G285E), and have analysed the effect of these and other recently described mutations (A313T, I556N) on(More)
By using homozygosity mapping in a consanguineous Pakistani family, we detected linkage of nonsyndromic hearing loss to a 7.6 Mb region on chromosome 3q13.31-q21.1 within the previously reported DFNB42 locus. Subsequent candidate gene sequencing identified a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.1135G>T [p.Glu379X]) in ILDR1 as the cause of hearing impairment. By(More)
Migraine is the most common brain disorder, affecting approximately 14% of the adult population, but its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We report the results of a meta-analysis across 29 genome-wide association studies, including a total of 23,285 individuals with migraine (cases) and 95,425 population-matched controls. We identified 12 loci(More)
Mutations in ATP13A2 (PARK9) have been linked to juvenile parkinsonism with dementia or Kufor-Rakeb syndrome (KRS). The ATP13A2 gene encodes at least three protein isoforms that arise by alternate splicing. A previous study indicated the Atp13a2(Isoform-1) protein is localized to lysosomes, whereas three separate mutations involved in disease cause(More)