Christen Rune Stensvold

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Few studies have targeted the relative performance of diagnostic methods used for the detection of Blastocystis, a unicellular organism often present in fecal specimens from individuals with and without gastrointestinal symptoms. Aims of this study included a comparison of the formol ethyl acetate concentration technique (FECT), permanent trichrome staining(More)
Blastocystis is a common intestinal micro-eukaryote found in both humans and non-human hosts and known to be genetically very diverse. It has been divided into numerous subtypes (STs), nine of which have been identified in humans to date. Surveys of ST prevalence have started to emerge over the past few years but to date no data are available for any(More)
Blastocystis is a ubiquitous enteric protistan parasite that has extensive genetic diversity and infects humans and many other animals. Distinct molecular methodologies developed to detect variation and obtain information about transmission patterns and clinical importance have resulted in a confusing array of terminologies for the identification and(More)
Two independent studies were conducted to describe symptoms and potential risk factors associated with Blastocystis infection. Isolates were subtyped by molecular analysis. In the NORMAT study (126 individuals randomly sampled from the general population) 24 (19%) were positive for Blastocystis. Blastocystis was associated with irritable bowel syndrome(More)
Blastocystis is a common unicellular anaerobic eukaryote that inhabits the large intestine of many animals worldwide, including humans. The finding of Blastocystis in faeces in mammals and birds has led to proposals of zoonotic potential and that these hosts may be the source of many human infections. Blastocystis is, however, a genetically diverse complex(More)
Blastocystis isolates from 56 Danish synanthropic and zoo animals, 62 primates primarily from United Kingdom (UK) collections and 16 UK primate handlers were subtyped by PCR, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. A new subtype (ST) from primates and artiodactyls was identified and designated as Blastocystis sp. ST10. STs isolated from non-human primates(More)
Blastocystis is a common enteric protist colonizing probably more than 1 billion people along with a large variety of non-human hosts. This protist has been linked to symptoms and diseases such as abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, flatulence and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Remarkable genetic diversity has been observed, leading to the subdivision(More)
To expand the representation for phylogenetic analysis, ten additional complete Entamoeba small-subunit rRNA gene sequences were obtained from humans, non-human primates, cattle and a tortoise. For some novel sequences no corresponding morphological data were available, and we suggest that these organisms should be referred to as ribosomal lineages (RL)(More)
Blastocystis SSU-rDNA sequence data from 317 captive and free-living non-human primates (NHPs) representing 30 genera of apes, Old and New World (OW and NW) monkeys and prosimians were analysed to investigate subtype (ST) and allele distribution among hosts. Excluding 20 mixed ST infections, 27% of the sequences belonged to ST1, 22% to ST2, 34% to ST3, 1%(More)
Blastocystis is a genetically diverse and widespread intestinal parasite of animals and humans with controversial pathogenic potential. At least nine subtypes of Blastocystis have been found in humans. The genetic diversity of Blastocystis was examined in stool samples from 68 patients from the Stockholm area, Sweden. Blastocystis was identified by light(More)