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Cryptochrome-Dependent and -Independent Circadian Entrainment Circuits in Drosophila
Entrainment to environmental light/dark (LD) cycles is a central function of circadian clocks. In Drosophila, entrainment is achieved by Cryptochrome (CRY) and input from the visual system. DuringExpand
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A Tug-of-War between Cryptochrome and the Visual System Allows the Adaptation of Evening Activity to Long Photoperiods in Drosophila melanogaster
In many animals, the circadian clock plays a role in adapting to the coming season by measuring day length. The mechanism for measuring day length and its neuronal circuits remains elusive, however.Expand
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Phase-Shifting the Fruit Fly Clock without Cryptochrome
The blue light photopigment cryptochrome (CRY) is thought to be the main circadian photoreceptor of Drosophila melanogaster. Nevertheless, entrainment to light-dark cycles is possible withoutExpand
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A New Rhodopsin Influences Light-dependent Daily Activity Patterns of Fruit Flies
Rhodopsin 7 (Rh7), a new invertebrate Rhodopsin gene, was discovered in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster in 2000, but its function has remained elusive. We generated an Rh7 null mutant (Rh70) byExpand
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Drosophila Rhodopsin 7 can partially replace the structural role of Rhodopsin 1, but not its physiological function
Rhodopsin 7 (Rh7), a new invertebrate Rhodopsin gene, was discovered in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster in 2000 and thought to encode for a functional Rhodopsin protein. Indeed, Rh7 exhibitsExpand
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The characterization of the circadian clock in the olive fly Bactrocera oleae (Diptera: Tephritidae) reveals a Drosophila-like organization
The olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae, is the single most important pest for the majority of olive plantations. Oxitec’s self-limiting olive fly technology (OX3097D-Bol) offers an alternativeExpand
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Rhodopsin 7 and Cryptochrome - circadian photoreception in Drosophila
The blue light photopigment cryptochrome (CRY) is thought to be the main circadian photoreceptor of Drosophila melanogaster. Nevertheless, entrainment to light-dark cycles is possible withoutExpand
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Author Correction: The characterization of the circadian clock in the olive fly Bactrocera oleae (Diptera: Tephritidae) reveals a Drosophila-like organization
A correction to this article has been published and is linked from the HTML and PDF versions of this paper. The error has not been fixed in the paper.
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